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Comparison Of Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" And Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner"

1438 words - 6 pages

Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" and Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner" are both predominantly science fiction texts, which represent concerns for humanity in the wild. Conversely, these dystopian texts have been composed in largely varying social, cultural and historical contexts, producing differing themes for both the composer and responder. Ultimately, changes in context affect the composer's implicit beliefs as to whether or not the current values of society will result in the marginalisation or complete destruction of the natural world."Brave New World" was first published in 1932, the interluding period between the two World Wars, where technological developments allowed for the mass destruction of human life. Economic depression had also set in, and disenchantment with democracy led to a desire for an alternative form of government. Stability was believed to be the key, and thus a turn towards Totalitarian regimes. Through Brave New World, Huxley satirises a world ruled with such narrow vision, primarily seen through the State motto, "Community, Identity, Stability."By constructing a paradoxical Utopia, Huxley warns his audience (that seek stability) of the dangers within a world that denies such fundamental aspects of humanity. "Everybody is happy now" and with 100 percent employment payment in soma, and entertainment such as the feelies, there is no cause for complaint. Disease and illness have been eradicated, with universal peace and co-operation the norm. Although ruled by a benevolent oligarchy, the citizens of Brave New World do not realise that in the process of gaining constancy in government, they have been dehumanised. The World State aims to control the human population, overriding the Darwinist theory of natural selection, because "the wheels must turn steadily, but they cannot turn untended." The state also functions independently of the natural world. As Mustapha Mond makes clear, "a love of nature keeps no factories busy."The Savage Reservation is juxtaposed to this new world, where the Indians live in harmony with the land. Here however we observe filth, poverty and disease. Huxley is imploring that authoritarianism would not solve present societal problems; however life 'in the wild' is not necessarily a positive existence. There must be a medium that can be achieved whereby people and nature co-exist, and government do not deprive people of their independence and individual thought.There are disparities between the context of Blade Runner and that of Brave New World, thus we are able to observe a shift in humanity's angsts and fears through the text. Blade Runner forecasts a much gloomier future on Earth, since the Cold War and nuclear experimentation had revealed nature's existence as finite. The government of Brave New World view the marginalisation of nature as integral to the permanence of the world state. Scott however believes that it is indeed globalisation and trans-national corporations that are responsible for the...

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