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Comparison Of "Brave New World" By Aldous Huxley And "1984" By George Orwell

1414 words - 6 pages

David Lilienthal, a writer, once said, "The idea of utopia is mischievous as well as unrealistic" (www.famousquotes.com). A dream for a utopian society always exists, but it remains a dream. In the novels Brave New World and 1984, the manipulations and recreations of society cause perfection. Winston Smith, the protagonist of 1984, is a low-ranking member of the ruling Party in Oceania. Part of the Ministry of Truth, he alters historical documents to keep stability in the utopian society. John, the main character of Brave New World, has a feeling of alienation in the supposed utopian society because of his savage roots and teachings. He has an incapability of understanding the civilized ...view middle of the document...

As Huxley grew as an author, his writing became increasingly serious. He struggled to determine man's role in society and how to find the meaning of his perception. Huxley died in November 1963, mostly attributed by his experimentation of LSD (Baker 1).Winston Smith, the protagonist of 1984, leads an insignificant and tragically average life. Orwell named his hero after Winston Churchill, England's great leader during World War II (www.novelguide.com). The narrator describes Winston as "a chinless man" (Orwell 194). The narrator states, "I'm thirty-nine years old," to reveal some characteristics of Winston (Orwell 5). As a flawed and conflicted hero, Winston lacks the intelligence or physical prowess to use his knowledge of the past against the Party. The trust that Winston places in O'Brien and Mr. Charrington leads to his tortured demise. However, Winston's ability to trust makes him human and heroic in a world built on deceit. Though he never appears in the novel, and though he may not actually exist, Big Brother, the perceived ruler of Oceania, develops into an extremely important figure. Everywhere Winston looks he sees posters of Big Brother's face bearing the message "Big Brother is watching you" (Orwell 5). Big Brother's image appears on every coin and broadcast on the unavoidable telescreens; it haunts Winston's life and fills him with hatred and fascination (www.novelguide.com).John, the main protagonist of Brave New World, arises from a savage environment. Lenina says, "from those round chambers...a ghastly troop of monsters...masked out of semblance of humanity" regarding the savages that surround her (Huxley 113). He finds it difficult to make a transition to the World State. Based on Shakespeare's plays, John's views of life make him incompatible with World State life. Shakespeare embodies all of the human and humanitarian values that people abandon in the World State. John's rejection of the shallow happiness of the World State, his inability to reconcile his love and lust for Lenina, and even his eventual suicide all reflect themes from Shakespeare. Both protagonists share a difficulty of adapting to their societies. Winston builds a feeling of repression because of the government that controls him, and he will do anything to destroy the corruption. John's adaptation skills restrain him from accepting the demoralized society that he dreamt to reach (www.novelguide.com).1984 begins in Oceania in a city that people still call London, in a country now known as "Airstrip One" (Orwell 7). The most important thing about the setting reveals that London became Oceania in the near future. The destroyed city results from the effects of World War II. As this quote reveals, "the bomb had demolished a group of houses two hundred meters up the street" (Orwell 72). The setting for Brave New World starts primarily in London, "in the year of stability, A.F. 632", about 400 years into the...

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