Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention And Control Act

949 words - 4 pages

Americans have been experimenting with drugs since the 19th century, it wasn’t until the 20th century that addiction and dependence started to become a problem that the country continues to try to deal with it today. Asian immigrants were associated smoking opium; crack/cocaine and heroin was associated with blacks; latinos and hispanics were associated with marijuana; methamphetamine in the 1990s was associated with homosexuals and poor white people. Racial tension against these unwanted groups and wanting them out of society has been what stirred up a major push for trying to get rid of these drugs. There is no denying that many of the laws that lead to the creation of the ...view middle of the document...

The DEA limited the amount of times any controlled substance could be given within a 1 year period. They also limited the amount of schedule I and II drugs that can be manufactured within the US in a given year.
Originally Nixon intended for 2/3 of the law and its financial funding to be aimed at treatment of drug addiction. To earn more votes during his second campaign for presidency his administration urged him to focus on endorsing and supporting law enforcement in helping fight drug crime across the country. The concept took off across the country, focus was shifted from helping people to punishing them instead.
During the mid-70s and well into the 90s, this law was less about preventing and controlling drugs and more about establishing policies and procedures for punishing illegal use and sale of various drugs. Individual states focused on beefing up criminalization of drug laws and punishing anyone associated with drugs. Money was funded to prisons and law enforcement. During this time of the war on drugs Americans associate drugs with bad people intentionally doing bad things, in essence criminals. People didn’t want to treat and help people deemed criminals by society, they want them punished. President Bill Clinton also set back the law when he signed NAFTA. Higher volume of imported goods made it difficult to catch drugs being smuggled into US. The military’s budget was increased by up to 50% to aid in fighting the war on drugs. But after about 40 years of fighting to keep drugs off of our streets, there has been no real decrease in drug use.
The types of drugs being used has shifted majorly but Americans are still using dangerous drugs and they are easily available and cheap even with all of the strict regulations put in place. So why is it that even though this law seems so unsuccessful does is continue to be persistent? People...

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