Conditions At The Frontlines Were Destructive For Soldiers In Ww1 Discuss

1002 words - 4 pages

"Conditions at the front lines were destructive for the soldiers in WW1"DiscussThere is no question that conditions in the front lines in WW1 were destructive for the soldiers. WW1 took the greatest toll on human life of any war until that time.I believe that the conditions in the front lines were particularly destructive and devastating to the men for many reasons. New techniques used in trench warfare and the relatively new kinds of weaponry being used, such as heavy artillery and poison gas contributed to a much higher death toll with little opportunity to bury the dead. This led to a dangerous lack of sanitisation, and also prevented the normal opportunities of personal hygiene. Shortage of men prevented the frequent replenishment of food and water supplies which also led to sickness and death.The constant bombardment was the cause that there were so many dead bodies that were unburied; just lying on the ground rotting. It was almost impossible for soldiers to get any rest or sleep with the constant bombardment of enemy fire. The men were forced to sleep standing up in the trenches so that they wouldn't run the risk of being killed. The heavy artillery were a constant threat as they could be fired over long distances and land in a trench blowing up any soldiers positioned in that part of the trench. Heavy artillery such as tanks and mortars being used usually meant that there would be an attempt to gain more territory in the next few days. (In the battle of the Somme for instance; the Germans realised this and rushed all their men forward so that they would be able to slaughter the English and Australians as they attacked.Going over the top is when the soldiers had to go over the top of the trenches and step over the barb wire to charge across no-man's-land trying to gain territory. Going over the top is how many thousands of the soldiers were slaughtered or mown down by enemy gun fire. In the battle of the Somme for instance the men thought that there would not be any Germans left, but when they all started to climb over the top they were shot to pieces. The men who survived going over the top were more likely to suffer from mental illness than others, from seeing their mates all around them being slaughtered.It was dangerous for the men to put their heads above the trenches for too long in case they were blown off by snipers. It was also necessary for the soldiers to eat all their food cold as a fire would alert an enemy sniper to their positioning. In some parts of the trenches it became necessary for a soldier to raise their helmet above the trench before risking a look in case an enemy sniper was...

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