Confucianism, Taoism, And Buddhism In The Film Kung Fu Panda

787 words - 3 pages

The Bridge between Actual and Fictional
“Life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes. Don't resist them - that only creates sorrow. Let reality be reality. Let things flow naturally forward in whatever way they like” (Lau Tzu). Born into a life of noodles and relaxation Po, a chubby panda, always wanted to be a Kung Fu master. Out of nowhere an opportunity arises to have his dream become reality. Po, like any normal panda snatches up this once in a lifetime opportunity and runs with it. But when the going gets tough, he doesn’t know if this is the life he was meant to live. While the film was meant for enjoyment, DreamWorks has incorporated clear examples of the three major Chinese Schools of Thought: Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism.
One example is while Po is a panda and his dad is a duck, which in the second movie is made clear that he is adopted, there are definite examples of the relationships between father and son known in the Confucianism way of thinking. In the film, Po, just like his adoptive father and his family, pursue the dream of selling and making noodles. “Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life” (Confucius). Mr. Ping, Po’s dad, loves what he does and wants Po to honor the family and continue the noodle business just like his predecessors.
Next, since the village is located up high in the mountains, the palace and the Kung Fu warriors training space is surrounded by nature and its beauty. Nature is a major thought in Taoism. “Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity, reduce selfishness, have few desires” (Lau Tzu). The palace is in a secluded area and a plain design that is simple just as the teachings of Lau Tzu says to have in order to be a true Taoist. Also, throughout the movie, there are shots of beautiful plants and nature everywhere in the village that are obviously well kept and respected.
Third, whenever someone wanted something, the idea that in order to succeed you have to stop the desire to want was brought up. This was a big idea in the teachings of Buddhism. Master Oogway, as he is about to die, quotes: “You may wish for an apple or an orange, but you will get a...

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