Consequences Of The Printing Press On Exploration And Reformation

739 words - 3 pages

Ever wanted to find out what consequences the printing press had on exploration and reformation? Well, you can find out right here. To start off with, the printing press was invented in the 1450’s by Johannes Gutenberg. The idea was not new because in 600 CE the Chinese introduced woodblock printing. They even did a little experimenting with movable wooden blocks but with 50,000 characters it was impossible to carve. One of the reasons Gutenberg was so successful was that the alphabet at the time was much less than 50,000, which was much more realistic when carving. In about 1455 Gutenberg had about 180 bibles that were over 1800 pages long printed, by the year 1500 more than 20 million books had been printed, and by 1600 over 200 million books were in existence. The big question is though, which was the more important consequence of the printing press the reformation or exploration? Reformation was an important consequence of the printing press. However, an even more important consequence was exploration.
Reformation was clearly one important consequence of the invention of the printing press. The printing press was connected to the reformation in many ways. One of them is when a catholic priest named Martin Luther was unhappy with some of the ways of his church, so he published a document called 95 theses. (Doc B) This document quickly spread throughout Europe with the help of the printing press and by the year 1518 1/3 (about 300,000) of the books in world were by Martin Luther.(Doc B) Another example is as printing presses expanded yet Catholicism still dominated Europe, more people started converting to Protestantism. (Doc C) This is because as printing presses around Europe increased, the price of books decreased, due to supply and demand which allowed not only the rich to be exposed to new books, documents, writings, etc. but also everyone else. (Doc C) These reasons help prove that the reformation was an important consequence of the printing press because it shows that the printing press helped in creating more than one branch of Christianity around the world.
While the Reformation was important, an even greater consequence of the printing press...

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