Conspire In The Madness Essay

834 words - 4 pages

Hamlet is full of madness, both real and feigned. In the play there's madness scattered within just about every character and within just about every scene. Madness is what helped drive Hamlet's revenge for the murder of his father, madness drove Hamlet and his uncle against each other to their eventual death. Which characters were the sane, and which were the mad ones?
The difference between the sane and mad charaters in the play is somewhat simple. In general, the sane characters plotted in rationally simple ways. Sometimes cynically and well thought out, other times in unselfish kind ways. "Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For a loan oft loses both itself and fried, And borrowing ...view middle of the document...

Both of their madness' causes them to act in ways their will would normally not let them do. In the opening scene Hamlet appears as a dark, deep thinker, with the aura of a philosipher sorrounding him. It's not until the ecounter with the ghots of his father that his entire demeanor is altered. From the gloomy thinker to a revenge fueled madman focused on the sole purpose of avenging his father's undeserving murder. Ophelia's madness, pure madness, causes her to behave in the typical manner a lunatic would, out of character and flat out wierd. The usually calm and docile Ophelia begins to sing strange songs while wandering about, skipping between random moodswings, and mistaking nails for a daisies. Both Hamlet's and Ophelia's madness leads to their deaths; Where it not for the madness in his quest for revenge, Hamlet's life could have been sparred, where it not for Ophelia's madness she wouldn't have drowned. Both Hamlet's and Ophelia's behavior is out of their first shown character's personality, but even though Hamlet's and Ophelia's madness do share some similarities, they also share their differences.
Easily the most noteable difference between the two are that; Hamlet's madness is more of a complex “act” which he uses to mislead everyone from his plans, while again, Ophelia is simply crazy. Hamlet's...

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