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Comparison Between "The Passionate Shepherd To His Love" By Christopher Marlowe And "To The Virgins, To Make Much Of Time" Robert Herrick

620 words - 2 pages

In the two carpe diem poems, “The Passionate shepherd to His Love” by Christopher Marlowe and “To the Virgins, to make much of time” Robert Herrick, the author uses few poetic devices to make there point and portray the theme. “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” is about a shepherd asking for a lady to marry him and he will comfort her and give her all the pleasures. “To the Virgins, to make much of time” is addressing all single women to marry young as before you know it, you will be old.“The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” uses images “That valleys, groves, hills, and fields, woods, or steepy mountain yields” to show the pleasures the shepherd wants to have and experience with his love. He also uses hyperbole “And I will make thee beds of roses/ and a thousand fragrant posies” to show what kind of things the shepherd promises to do for his love. The tone the author uses also portrays the theme as the shepherd sounds so carefree because he believes everything will work out and will be alright and he will get his woman if he keeps flattering her with his words.In “To the Virgins, to make much of time”, the author uses images “Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old time is still a-flying; And this same flower that smiles today, Tomorrow will be dying” to show his point that time flies, today you’re young and before you know it you will be old tomorrow. He also uses allusion of the Greek god “ The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun, The higher he’s a-getting, The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he’s to setting” as an example to show that the sooner you get married the better, if you get married you are complete.The...

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