This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Copper And Molybdenum Deposits In The United States

2658 words - 11 pages

Copper and molybdenum resources were not recognized as valuable commodities until economic needs demanded the collection and processing of these minerals in large amounts. The most expansive deposits of copper and molybdenum occur in massive low grade ores and are found in intrusive porphyry formations, although many smaller sized but higher grade ores are located in non-porphyry areas. The nation has abundant domestic copper ore reserves but because of many detrimental economic factors much of the copper used by the U.S. industry is imported. Molybdenum ore is profuse and exports of it are high to fulfill the needs of foreign demand.Copper was first used by people around 4000 B.C. in the manufacture of tools because of its malleability and later became an important additive in harder, more useful metals such as bronze (copper+tin; 2500 B.C.) and brass (copper+zinc; 0 A.D.). The growth of copper production in the United States has been a relatively recent occurrence. North American French explorers knew of sources of native copper in the region of Lake Superior and the area natives had copper jewelry and ornamentation. Earnest copper mining began in Simsbury, Connecticut about 1709 and copper was actually exported to England after a source was discovered in New Jersey around 1719. In later times domestic copper resources did not satisfy national needs until the discovery of gold in California shifted the focus of mineral exploration westward and strikes of rich copper ores occurred in Tennessee and the Cordilleran base regions. The Civil War caused copper demand to increase greatly in order to manufacture cartridges and canned goods, this resulted in the openings of numerous copper mines of which more than 90% were in the Lake Superior area giving an important advantage to the Union armies. Major copper production districts then shifted to Montana and Arizona in the early 1890's. Production increased to reach peak levels of 900,000 tons a year during World War I and in 1970 1,600,000 tons of copper were produced but recent levels are lower, fluctuating between 1-1.5 million tons a year. Technology has aided in increasing production efficiency wich resulted in spectacular resource development in the U.S. and around the world.Molybdenum has been a major mineral since 1898 when it was discovered to harden steel as an additive and useful in compounding chemicals and dyes. Substantial mining began in 1900 in the southwest but the demand was so low that activity ceased in 1900. In 1906 the molybdenum industry boomed and with the dawn of WWI the need for quality steel further increased the necessity for this important additive. The highest production levels occurred during the early 1980's when 68,000 tons were mined, current levels are lower mirroring the copper production curve because more than half of the molybdenum produced is a by-product of the copper industry.There are many different types of copper and molybdenum deposits in the world all...

Find Another Essay On Copper and Molybdenum Deposits in the United States

Federalism and Poverty in the United States

2011 words - 8 pages Federalism and Poverty in the United States Many Americans believe that the federal government is too big, both in the number of agencies it directs and in the scope of its powers. Some people also think that the daily business of Capitol Hill has no effect on their lives, in part because they believe that politicians do not understand their problems. This dissatisfaction with Washington, D.C., in recent years has renewed debate over the

"Blacks and Education in the United States"

2920 words - 12 pages This paper is about the struggles and obstacles that were created by the United States in order to keep schools segregated.Blacks and Education in the United StatesAfrican American Studies9 December 2003CONTENTSBlack Education Research Paper 5-14List of Graphs 4SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 15LIST OF GraphsBlack Education Attainment 12White Education Attainment 13African Americans who were enslaved wished for freedom. While enslaved, the African

Poverty and Children in the United States

1767 words - 7 pages The United States of America...the land of the free and the home of the brave, a country that is considered to be the world's current super power, is trillions of dollars in debt, and has almost 40 million families with 20 million children living within low-income levels (Mailman School of Public Health , 2010). Being a super nation that boasts about living the American dream, where an immigrant can become rich in an instant, the typical

Diabetes and Cancer in the United States

617 words - 3 pages Both diabetes and cancer are diseases that cause tremendous health burden worldwide. The prevalence of diabetes in the U.S. in 2007 was 11% for persons aged 20 years and older (23.6 million individuals). Of these, type 2 diabetes accounted for ∼95% of cases. Cancer is the 2nd and diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that people with type II diabetes have an increased risk of liver, endometrium

The United States in Decline

2366 words - 9 pages One of the most vigorous debates focuses on the current status of the United States hegemony and whether or not it is in decline. This begs the question, if the United States is indeed declining in status, will it still be an influential player or not? I argue that the United States is losing its prominent position as the hegemonic leader of the world, but will still remain an influential player in global politics in the following decades to

Hispanics In The United States

1253 words - 6 pages Hispanic population is steadily rising in the United States. As the second largest ethnic group in the United States, Hispanic Americans account for 14.4 % of the total United States or almost 47 million nationally. While some Hispanic Americans are improving socially and economically, others are slowly declining. They also struggle with social, political, and linguistic acceptance. There are concerns over rights and regulations of Hispanic

Homelessness in the United States

1474 words - 6 pages According to the National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness, “approximately 3.5 million people are homeless each year, while 36.3 million live in households without enough food.” This statistic only reflects the United States, and to many people, it just doesn’t make sense. For instance Alfredzine Black of the YWCA in Marion, Indiana says, “I don’t understand why we have so much poverty in the richest country in the world

Divorce in the United States

1250 words - 5 pages only 6 weeks -- and file for divorce on grounds ofmental cruelty.Popular attitudes toward divorce changed as the United Statesbecame more urbanized and less religious. The increasingacceptance of divorce was reflected in court interpretations ofexisting laws and in new legislation enacted by the states. Twotendencies merged, making possible the establishment of new andeasier grounds for divorce. The focus of state divorce, whichpreviously concerned

Immigration in the United States

1104 words - 4 pages The United States has often been referred to as a global “melting pot” due to its assimilation of diverse cultures, nationalities, and ethnicities. In today’s society, this metaphor may be an understatement. Between 1990 and 2010, the number of foreign born United States residents nearly doubled from 20 million to 40 million, increasing the U.S. population from almost 250 million to 350 million people. With U.S. born children and grandchildren

Poverty in the United States

1004 words - 5 pages It certainly seems peculiar how so much disparity exists among the haves and have-nots in the country that leads the free world. The high level of poverty in the United States coupled with the disparaging rates of income are at times hard to comprehend. How can a country of such great wealth and power also be a country of vast poverty? Poverty will always be evident in the United States to some extent. However, minimizing poverty and income

Immigration in the United States

1338 words - 5 pages Latinos and Asians also came to America as immigrants. Immigration has helped the United States by giving a helping hand and providing a workforce to deal with America’s growing manufacturing economy. In 1880-1930 more than 27 million new immigrants came to America from Italy, Germany, Europe, Russia, England, Canada, Ireland, and Sweden. Apart from all these countries, Mexico is the largest immigration source country. Chinese and Indian immigrants

Similar Essays

Immigration And Nativism In The United States

2141 words - 9 pages Immigration and Nativism in the United States In the United States, the cliché of a nation of immigrants is often invoked. Indeed, very few Americans can trace their ancestry to what is now the United States, and the origins of its immigrants have changed many times in American history. Despite the identity of an immigrant nation, changes in the origins of immigrants have often been met with resistance. What began with white

Labor In The United States And Outsourcing

1158 words - 5 pages during the 1980s that the process kicked off mainly due to the efforts of corporations when they began to hire labor forces across the world. Even though outsourcing has come out from its developing stages, there are still following effects on the US economy. Since the concept of outsourcing was introduced it has been a subject of debate between politicians and citizens of the United States. Remarkably, it was the United States who supported

Taxes And Inflation In The United States

1235 words - 5 pages Taxes and Inflation in the United States In the United States, there are two things that are certain: death and taxes. Everyone pays taxes. From big corporations and small businesses, down to the single, blue collar worker. These taxes are deducted from each individual’s income which are known as income taxes and are paid with the purchase of everyday commodities and services, also known as sales tax. There are three different governments

Diversity And Business In The United States

1507 words - 6 pages Diversity and Business in the United States The demographics of the United States are changing at a rapid pace and consequently we are observing a “transformation in the culture and buying habits of this nation.” (Robinson, Pfeffer, & Buccigrossi, 2003) As a result, historically small niche markets are gaining an increasing prevalence within the U.S. marketplace and have substantially higher buying power. If companies are to continue to