Copyleft And Cory Doctorow Essay

1274 words - 5 pages

I value people that aren't afraid to fall on their face. I look up to those who take smart, legendary risks and that is why Cory Doctorow is my hero (see picture in appendix). He hasn't saved lives, discovered anything special or overcame anything, it is because he did something radically different with his writing talent. He is a science fiction writer and avid blogger. According to his web site, Doctorow has written five novels and won many awards. His young adult story, Little Brother was nominated for the 2008 Hugo, Nebula, Sunburst and Locus Awards. It won the Ontario Library White Pine Award, the Prometheus Award as well as the Indienet Award (Doctorow). He has been featured in Wired, Popular Science, Make, New York Times, and many other newspapers, magazines and websites. The blog he co-edits; Boing Boing is "A Directory of Wonderful Things" and reports on things like Amazon's poor e-book system and other "wonderful" things (Doctorow - Boing Boing). In addition to his writing Cory Doctorow, is a copyleft activist. Copyleft is the general term for a license that requires the work created to be given away for free, and says derivative work must be licensed similarly. (See watermark)
Instead of copyrighting his work and hoping to sell books, he gives his work away for free. This not only helps spread the popularity of his work. It creates a whole new option to help new and existing writers share their content with others in the mosh pit that is the internet. If you are an independent artist and want to increase the popularity of your work, I suggest you follow in the steps of Cory Doctorow. I believe with his voice and copyleft licenses he has and will continue to change the way our books, movies, music and other content is shared, for the better.
Traditional copyright started as a way to encourage creativity while maintaining artist's rights like the way copyleft is today (Gaylor). The Statute of Anne, passed by the British Parliament in 1710 was the first copyright law and basis for the US copyright law passed eighty years later (Piatt). In order to keep the rights of the public, work was released into the public domain 14 years after copyrighted. This worked until more advanced forms of copying were created that broke the old business method. Each new method such as the printing press, VHS tapes and of course the internet allowed copies to be made without paying the content owners. What made the internet so different, was that it allowed content consumers to become content providers (Gaylor). Before the internet if you wanted to get content you had to go to a bookstore or a record store, pirating wasn't so simple. There was no YouTube to showcase the greatest average-joe creation, content was mostly all distributed by corporations in the form of different publishing companies. But as more advanced forms of copying were created and artists felt that their rights were being taken away, the year from when work enters the public domain in...

Find Another Essay On Copyleft and Cory Doctorow

Human Cloning and Congress Essay

852 words - 3 pages Human Cloning and Congress     Recent months have seen news of biotech advances all along the front: cloned cats, artificial wombs, nascent human-animal hybrids, genetic selection of embryos for implantation, fetal-tissue manipulation--and on, and on, nearly every day bringing some news item about the technology that is redefining what it means to be human. The question is, do we want this redefinition? And this essay attempts to answer...

Human Cloning Should Not Be Regulated

1084 words - 4 pages           For centuries, man has been genetically modifying everything from food to dogs by using a process called selective breeding.  This process takes the best of what you have and makes more of it, or mixes the best of one with the best of another to see what happens.  Even though this process is relatively refined, it is still subject to trial and error.  Today’s cloning technology allows scientists to identify the genetic quality that...

A Marxist Reading of Shakespeare's Coriolanus

2309 words - 9 pages A Marxist Reading of Coriolanus       One popular dissecting instrument of any Shakespearean character is the modern tool of psychoanalysis. Many of Shakespeare's great tragic heroes-Macbeth, Hamlet, King Lear, and Othello, to name a few-have all been understood by this method of plying back and interpreting the layers of motivation and desire that constitute every individual. Add to this list Shakespeare's Roman warrior Coriolanus. His...

DeVere or William Shakespeare?

2880 words - 12 pages DeVere or Shakespeare?         Abstract:  The debate over the legitimacy of the authorship of Shakespearean works has been disputed for centuries. While many scholars have held beliefs that Shakespeare's works have been written by figures such as Christopher Marlowe, Francis Bacon, William Stanley, and others, the most heated debate today is between William Shakespeare and Edward DeVere, the Earl of Oxford. Each side of this debate has many...

My Antonia Essay: The Character of Lena Lingard

1827 words - 7 pages The Character of Lena Lingard in My Antonia            Lena Lingard is the best example of a non-domestic central character which appears amidst the domesticity of My Ántonia. Often the sections which feature Lena instead of Ántonia are seen as confusing divergences from the plot line of a novel that purports to be about the woman named in the title. However, since Lena appears in the novel almost as often as Ántonia, and more often than...

Coppola's Adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula

1168 words - 5 pages Coppola's Adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula      The legendary creature Dracula has mesmerized readers and viewers for nearly a century. In Bram Stoker's masterpiece, Dracula, the infamous monster affects each reader in a different way. Some find the greatest fear to be the sacrilegious nature of his bloodsucking attacks, while others find themselves most afraid of Dracula's shadow-like omnipresent nature. The fascination with Dracula has...

Coppola's Interpretation of Dracula as a Love Story

1453 words - 6 pages Coppola's Interpretation of Dracula as a Love Story       The protagonist and story of Bram Stoker's novel Dracula have been widely interpreted and adapted in films throughout many years. Despite almost a century of time since the initial publication, Dracula has maintained its ability to frighten and mesmerize readers. Francis Ford Coppola's Bram Stoker's Dracula; however, utilizes the erotic romance of the original novel in order to...

Freedom of Speech and Expression - Little Freedom in a Complex World

1185 words - 5 pages Little Freedom of Expression Freedom of expression, like the air we breathe, is a luxury that most people in western civilization take for granted. I know I certainly took it for granted when I was in the twelfth grade, and that presumption almost got me expelled. In Cornwall, Ontario this last December the idea of freedom of speech did more than get a young man expelled. He was forced to spend the better part of a month, including...

The Psychology of the Serpent in D.H. Lawrence's Snake

1585 words - 6 pages The Psychology of the Serpent in D.H. Lawrence's 'Snake'       Less than 17% of the world's snakes are poisonous and less than half of these are dangerous to man. The risk of death as a result of snakebite is, in fact, lower than the risk of being struck by lightning (Pinney 138). Nonetheless, cross-culturally and throughout the world, the snake is an object of fascination, fear, and respect for humankind. The serpent is a source of...

The Subtle Truth of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

2254 words - 9 pages The Subtle Truth of Jane Eyre       The role of a woman in Victorian England was an unenviable one. Social demands and personal desires were often at cross-purposes. This predicament was nothing new in the 19th century, yet it was this period that would see the waters begin to stir in anticipation of the cascading changes about to shake the very foundation of an empire on the brink of global colonization and industrialization. The question...

An Analysis of Communism

659 words - 3 pages An Analysis of Communism   Different forms of government have existed through the ages, including capitalism, monarchy, socialism, dictatorship, and theocracy. Communism is a government that developed in the early nineteen hundreds. The theory of communism is to create a government under which all people are equal. Communism hasn't achieved its goal to make all people equal.   The leaders of communist nations have shown an...

Similar Essays

Little Brother: The Tech Geek Subculture

2062 words - 8 pages Surname PAGE 8 NameProfessorSubjectDateLittle Brother: The Tech Geek SubcultureThe culture of a society, ever since its creation, is divided into two groups: the dominant culture and the subculture. The dominant culture is held by the majority as the standard; while the subculture, being distinct or hidden from the majority, is often characterized as systematic opposition to the dominant culture. Subcultures are often perceived as negative...

Defective By Design Essay

1458 words - 6 pages Digital Rights Management, or DRM, systematically destroys innovation in the entertainment industry. The various entertainment industries that lobby for more laws supporting DRM implementation in their products claim 'pirates' cause them to lose a noticeable amount of money. The argument presented by these companies allows them to get away with these DRM schemes, which hurt not only the consumer, but also the industry as a whole. All DRM...

Analysis Of Frightning Fear In "Little Brother"

1590 words - 6 pages Analysis of Frightening Fear in “Little Brother” Fear is what many of the dictators are made out of and it has now become one of the biggest and most common ways of ruling over people today. The use of fear is being spread across the world quite fast and it is being used as a top technique for many things. Whether it is a mother teaching behaviour to her kid or a bank loan that you still haven’t paid, fear will always do the trick and this...

The Loving Dead Essay

1272 words - 5 pages Love, Lust and Death are universal human experiences and perpetual literary themes. "The Loving Dead" blends them in a way that I have never seen before. Amelia Beamer's debut novel involves: Oakland California, twenty-something slackers, their angsts and relationships, and a zombie apocalypse. Its characters are realistically self-centered, its apocalypse realistically dealt with more through text messaging and comment threads than through the...