Crime And Punishment In Medieval Europe

1212 words - 5 pages

Lesson chosen:
The lesson is situated in the fourth week, and is the eleventh and second last lesson in the unit outline.
Lesson aims in relation to Content Focus:
The aim of this lesson will be to develop students understanding of crime and punishment in Medieval Europe. As outlined in AUSVELS, this will include investigating different kinds of crime and punishment utilised and the ways the nature of crime and punishment has either stayed the same throughout history, or changed over time.
Contributions of this Lesson:
This lesson is positioned after a study into Medieval Europe’s significant individuals. During the previous lesson, students were introduced to individuals such as Charlemagne, and were able to create a presentation, ad or speech either for or against that person. As a result of the previous lesson, students will be able to understand the significance war had on the memory of historical figures. The next lesson will be able to build upon this knowledge by continuing discussion about war, and the possible punishments for those who rebelled in any way. This initial discussion will be broadened by talking about general crime and punishment during the medieval period, asking questions in the discussion such as who, what, when, where and how. At the conclusion of this lesson, student will have developed a deeper understanding into the different forms of torture in medieval Europe, and how it compares to punishment in modern day Australia. In the following lesson, students will be continuing discussions about the comparison of medieval crimes and punishment to the evolution of the nature of justice. This will transition into developing students’ knowledge on the Australian legal system and origin of common and statutory law. Students will then learn about the purposes of laws and consider examples of the process of making and changing them. Additionally, they will be given a task to evaluate the merits and successes of the principles in Australia’s legal system such as justice, the presumption of innocence and equality before the law. Further, they will identify the mandatory conditions for a fair trial and conclude the lesson with a discussion about the comparison of the notion of which legal system students believe is more fair, either Medieval Europe or Australia today.
Justification of Pedagogies:
As a means of making students engage in a meaningful way, Inquiry-based pedagogy has been utilised to ensure students actively participate in the lesson. As stated by Godinho, Inquiry is a systematic, sequenced study, a dispositional way of thinking in a conversational way (Godinho 2013 p.237). Fundamentally inquiry-based pedagogy emphasizes procedure over content, theoretical understanding, student-2013 p.237). This approach of learning is a critical tool in the classroom as students need to know how to think critically when they enter their future professions rather than just knowing how to replicate information. If the lesson had...

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