Critical Analysis Of Darkness At Noon By Harold Krents

1248 words - 5 pages

Critical Analysis of Darkness at Noon by Harold Krents

In "Darkness at Noon", Harold Krents vividly describes some of the everyday prejudices disabled citizens must face. Presented in an often humorous fashion, the author opens the reader’s eyes to the cruel ironies of society’s preconceived and inaccurate judgments, and their long reaching effects on his life.

Krents begins his essay by pointing out to the reader that he cannot see himself, and thus, often has to depend upon the viewpoints of others. He states: "To date it has not been narcissistic." The average reader may not be aware that the word "narcissistic" means, "Excessively in love with oneself." It is helpful for the reader to keep this first observation in mind as he continues through the article, and hears Krent’s descriptions of society’s viewpoints.

Krents points out three particular judgments that are often passed on him by the public. "There are those who assume that since I can’t see, I obviously cannot hear" then, "…others know that of course I can hear, but believe that I can’t talk" and finally "The toughest misconception of all is the view that because I can’t see, I can’t work." It is surely an unfortunate irony, that the disabled citizen must not only deal with his own burdens, but also, the imaginary ones placed upon him by society. Krents supports his statements using appealing illustrative stories with effective imagery. Krent’s chooses to use words which are effective, and relay a definite scene to the reader. Some examples are: "…enunciating each word very carefully", "..if the dread word is spoken, the ticket agent’s retina will immediately detach…"and "…my saint-like disposition deserted me…I finally blurted out…" He creates intense sympathy between the reader and himself by telling his stories in a personable and friendly writing voice.
After explaining these misconceptions of society, Krents begins to talk about their effect, "…one of the most disillusioning experiences of my life." Despite a cum laude degree from Harvard College, good ranking in his Harvard Law School class and perfectly acceptable qualifications, Krents was unable to find work. Krents states that the numerous rejection letters were "not based on my lack of ability but rather on my disability."

From this point on, the essay takes a rather downward spiral. Krents discontinues discussing his challenges in the work world without informing the reader of any outcome. The reader does not understand whether Krents ever received work or is now begging change off bystanders as he makes his living under a city bridge. Instead of clearing up these issues, Krents continues by recounting a seemingly isolated event in his own childhood. He begins the story by saying, "I therefore look forward to the day, with the expectation that it is certain to come, when employers will view their handicapped workers as a little child did me years ago…" He then describes a basketball...

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