This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Critical Analysis Of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle

2341 words - 9 pages

     The Jungle is a novel that focuses on a family of immigrants who came to America looking for a better life. The novel was written by Upton Sinclair, who went into the Chicago stockyards to investigate what life was like for the people who worked there. The book was originally written with the intent of showing Socialism as a better option than Capitalism for the society. However, the details of the story ended up launching a government investigation of the meat packing plants, and ultimately regulation of food products. It gave an informative view of what life was like in America at the time. Important topics like immigration, working conditions and sanitation issues of the time were all addressed well in the novel.

     Immigration was one of the heavy themes in the novel, including where immigrants came from and why they came to America, and how they were treated once they got here. The story is about a man from Lithuania, Jurgis Rudkus, who takes his family to America in hopes of attaining the American Dream. A family he knows has lost all their money to creditors in Lithuania and now have nowhere to live, but a member of the family, Jonas, talks about how a friend he knows who immigrated to America and had great success. The majority of the immigrants who came to America at this period, during the Industrial Revolution, were mainly “Lithuanians, Poles, Slovaks, or Bohemians” (28). Before them it was the Irish, and then before them the immigrants mostly coming to America were German (70). The reason that Jurgis decided that he would go to America is because of all the great things he had heard about it, about the ideal of being free. He had heard “In that country, rich or poor, a man was free, it was said; he did not have to go into the army, he did not have to pay out his money to rascally officials—he might do as he pleased, and count himself as good as any other man” (23). This is what many immigrants believe in, and they wanted to come to the country in hopes of finding the American Dream, where they could work hard and make their way to the top of the ladder, where they would live freely in success.

     However, the reality of what America was like was very harsh to most of the immigrants that flocked to it during the Industrial Revolution. For Jurgis and the eleven others he brought with on the voyage, they found that immigrants were often exploited in every way possible because they lacked knowledge of the country and the language. As they set out on the voyage to America, they were tricked by an officer into taking his passport, and another officer arresting him and charging him for it. They were also cheated out of their savings when they arrived in New York when an agent forced them to stay in his lodge that was much too expensive for them to afford (18). But when they reached the town, a stockyard called Packingtown where Meat Packing Plants were, it shows just how much advantage was taken of all these immigrants....

Find Another Essay On Critical Analysis of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle

Upton Sinclair's The Jungle as Socialist Propaganda

3353 words - 13 pages The Jungle as Socialist Propaganda   In the world of economic competition that we live in today, many thrive and many are left to dig through trashcans. It has been a constant struggle throughout the modern history of society. One widely prescribed example of this struggle is Upton Sinclair's groundbreaking novel, The Jungle. The Jungle takes the reader along on a journey with a group of recent Lithuanian immigrants to America

A Comparison of the Legacy of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle and Rachel Carson's Silent Spring

1701 words - 7 pages 1906 would see the publication of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle, pushing through major reforms of the meatpacking industry and eventually causing the government to take actions to protect the health of its people; almost fifty years later, the publication of Rachel Carson's novel Silent Spring would invoke a similar, but changed response to the threat of DDT. Although both would lead to government legislation creating major changes

Analysis of The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

1050 words - 5 pages Critics often argue that Upton Sinclair, author of many classic American novels including The Jungle, was cynical and bitter even. However if one were to dig just a bit deeper they may realize that Sinclair was spot on in his idea that this “American dream” that our country sells is actually a work of fiction. In his book The Jungle, Sinclair, points out the flaws of the American dream. Many immigrants traveled thousands of miles aboard

An Analysis Of The Jungle By Upton Sinclair

1412 words - 6 pages In the early 1900's life for America's new Chicago immigrant workers in the meat packing industry was explored by Upton Sinclair's novel The Jungle. Originally published in 1904 as a serial piece in the socialist newspaper Appeal to Reason, Sinclair's novel was initially found too graphic and shocking by publishing firms and therefore was not published in its complete form until 1906. In this paper, I will focus on the challenges faced by a

Modern Day Relevance of Sinclair's The Jungle

917 words - 4 pages widely prescribed example of this struggle is Upton Sinclair's groundbreaking novel, The Jungle. The Jungle takes the reader along on a journey with a group of recent Lithuanian immigrants to America. As well as a physical journey, this is a journey into a new world for them. They have come to America, where in the early twentieth century it was said that any man willing to work an honest day, would make a living and could support his family. It

Summary of The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

509 words - 2 pages The Jungle The Jungle by Upton Sinclair is about a Lithuanian family living in Chicago in the 1900’s. They had faith in the American dream, hoping to start a new and successful life. Unfortunately they were deprived of they hopes and dreams. They were placed in the middle of a society where only the strongest and richest survived. The rich keep getting richer and the poor get even poorer. Jurgis and his family went to extreme lengths just in

"The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair

1341 words - 5 pages Upton Sinclair. The Jungle. New York: Signet Classic. 1960.The Jungle by Upton Sinclair is a novel set in Packingtown, the meatpacking sector of Chicago. The time is set in the beginning of the twentieth century. Upton Sinclair tells the story of an immigrant named Jurgis and his family that come to America in search of wealth and the good life that they hear so much about. They believe so much in the American dream. However, life in America

"The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair

1328 words - 5 pages Thematic essay on "The Jungle"Basicly describes the capitalistic ways of governenment during the progressive area manifested into the meat packing section of Chicago. Vividly describes the hardships of imigrants in the early 1900's. What is the theme of The Jungle? What is Upton Sinclair's purpose behind this book?Title: The JungleAuthor: Upton SinclairThe Jungle as named by Upton Sinclair is an interesting story, describing the hardships

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

1118 words - 4 pages Upton Sinclair wrote The Jungle with an unabashed message in mind. Using his powerful descriptions of the repugnance of the meat packing industry as his vehicle, Sinclair conveyed his position of socialism and lamented the plight of the working-man.The Jungle's main character, Jurgis Rudkus, immigrates with his family to America from Lithuania with hopes of living the "American Dream". Instead, their dream is torn apart by the dreadful cruelties

The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair

820 words - 4 pages The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair, became an instant classic in 1906, and has become possibly one of the most referenced books in history and political science classrooms all over the United States, according to Dustin LaBarge (LaBarge para.1). Sinclair’s novel has generated worldwide awareness of the repulsive meat-packing industry. I found the book intriguing, because of the detail that was added in to make sure nothing was left out. There were

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

1593 words - 7 pages What are the major issues Sinclair addresses in The Jungle? The Jungle by Upton Sinclair is a vivid account of life for the working class in the early 1900s. Jurgis Rudkus and his family travel to the United States in search of the American dream and an escape from the rigid social structure of Lithuania. Instead, they find a myriad of new difficulties. Sinclair attributes their problems to the downfalls of capitalism in the United States

Similar Essays

Upton Sinclair's The Jungle Essay

1142 words - 5 pages Upton Sinclair's The Jungle Jurgis Rudkus and Ona Lukoszaite open the novel of The Jungle with a celebration of their wedding. The opening of the book highlights the best time that Jurgis and Ona will ever again experience during their stay in America. Jurgis is convinced that he can accomplish the American Dream, gaining prosperity from hard work and dedication. However, as the novel progresses, we soon see that this dream that Jurgis had

Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" Essay

670 words - 3 pages in the Rudkus family but surviving was the name of the game. It wasn't that Jurgis didn't work hard enough to fulfill his dream; it was that society under the economic system of capitalism didn't allow him to. No matter how hard Jurgis worked to get out of the lower class, he still remained at the bottom. Sinclair was trying to show the reader that capitalism was not for the better of all humanity. In Sinclair's eyes Jurgis' life was an

Quick Review Of Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle"

1168 words - 5 pages Upton Sinclair's The Jungle is a very powerful piece of literature devoted to shaking the corrupt foundations of the meat packing industries of Chicago during the turn of the century. Sinclair's purpose is clear: to expose the truth about the filthy ways of the city's establishments and to deliver justice to the common workingman. In order to achieve his desired goal, Sinclair incorporates the use of a fictional, immigrant family in the

What Was The Outcome Of Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle"?

1945 words - 8 pages fear. Consumers were not aware of the actual ingredients within the canned meat, surprisingly everything but the actually meat was processed. The Food and Drug Act protects consumers from what Upton Sinclair's novel entailed, restoring faith among America's meat-packing industry.Bibliography1)Sinclair, Upton. The Jungle. New York: Barnes and Noble Books, 19952)"Cattle Roof Gardens In Cleanly", New York Times, Vol. LV...No. 17,660, 1 June 1906, 1-23