Critique Of Bruno Bettelheim's And Karen Kolbenschlag's Interpretation Of "Cinderella"

911 words - 4 pages

As is well known, the famous storytale "Cinderella" has many variants across cultures and time periods. These variants have been found to have the same general plot, which is characterized by the persecuted heroine, the meeting with the prince, the revealing of an inner identity, and marriage with the prince. This plot is simple enough to be understood by a child, yet the details that support the story's timeless popularity are more difficult to discern, and are sometimes viewed quite differently by different critics. This shall be demonstrated in the synthesis of Freudian psychologist Bruno Bettelheim's work "'Cinderella': A Story of Sibling Rivalry and Oedipal Conflicts," and an excerpt from Feminist writer Madonna Kolbenschlag's work "Kiss Sleeping Beauty Good-Bye: Breaking the Spell of Feminine Myths and Models."The story of Cinderella finds its way into so many children's hearts because of a resemblance children feel with the heroine. Both Bettelheim and Kolbenschlag agree that sibling rivalry is both a very real and very strong force in a child's emotional composition. The feeling of unimportance inflicted by sibling rivalry allows children to associate closely with the character of Cinderella. Regardless of how absurdly overdramatized Cinderella's burdens seem to adults, children see themselves in a position that mirrors the characters'. Both critics go on to suggest that because Cinderella's "true identity" is later released, and that she "lives happily ever after," that children see themselves someday leading extraordinary lives also. Where Bettelheim and Kolbenschlag begin to differ on this topic is how each sex is affected differently by the main plot of the story. Bettelheim makes no distinction between the perceptions of girls and boys of the story, whereas Kolbenschlag says differently. Kolbenschlag feels that both boys and girls are attracted to the story in a similar manner, but she also believes that the tale lays a blueprint to be followed by girls in order to achieve the goal of happiness. This plan involves conforming to a male "ideal."Bettelheim also describes a variant for the attraction of children to "Cinderella." As a Freudian, he believes that all children undergo some period in their life where they feel ashamed and lowly because of their internalized thoughts and feelings. These feelings can stem from sibling jealousy to oedipal conflict, in which the child secretly desires to replace the parent of the same sex in order to achieve the undivided love of the other parent. These children believe that they deserve to be degraded because of their thoughts. They see Cinderella as being mistreated because she too, deserved it. When Cinderella becomes exalted at the end of the story, it delights the children who relate themselves so closely to her.Bettelheim and Kolbenschlag agree that the inclusion of ashes and...

Find Another Essay On Critique of Bruno Bettelheim's and Karen Kolbenschlag's interpretation of "Cinderella"

The Developent of Cinderella and Snow White

1979 words - 8 pages fantastical imagery continues to appeal to people of all ages. Over time, the tales’ major components have merged together and made their way into modern day movies, television shows and bedtime stories. As will be examined in this paper, Cinderella and Snow White, two well-known fairy tales developed on separate continents, are no exception. CULTURAL INTERPRETATION AND MODIFICATION Much like the game of “telephone,” it’s no surprise that

Comparative Analysis of "Cinderella" and "Ashputtle"

575 words - 2 pages The purpose of this paper is to make a comparative analysis of two perspectives on the children's story of Cinderella. It contrasts the time periods and cultures of France and Germany, whereas one was told to royalty and another to peasants. The constants of each version, such as the shoes and the prince will be compared as well.In Charles Perrault's "Cinderella", there is magic and music. This French version appears to have been written for

The Uses of Enchantment by Bruno Bettelheim

1048 words - 5 pages In "The Uses of Enchantment" writer Bruno Bettelheim states that fairy tales allow children to "find themselves" and "[...] find the other with whom they will be able to live happily ever after" (162); I agree with this because fairy tales present lessons in simple forms to help the child grasp the concepts, present daily life issues and anxieties, and allows children to understand the difference between good and bad. Fairy tales expose life in

Summary of Cinderella

934 words - 4 pages As children most of our life lessons were acquired through the simplicity of fairy tales. Subliminal messages taught us to always believe in true love and that good wins out over evil. Young and naïve, as children, all we desired was a good story and a nap, but the lessons we learned lasted a lifetime. Growing up my beloved fairy tale was Cinderella, not only does true love win but good wins over evil and eventually the world is

The Evolution of Cinderella

651 words - 3 pages Cinderella is a story nearly every person in the world has heard at least once during their childhood. Nowadays, most fairy tales that children hear are the versions made famous by Walt Disney, but his versions of these fairy tales weren't the first of their kind. Stories such as Cinderella have been around for ages, each version different from the one before it. One version was written by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm during the 1800's and was

"Out of the Dust" By Karen Hesse

626 words - 3 pages herself.The message of hope, and change echoes throughout this book as well as the importance of discovering oneself and where we really belong. As one reads you can see how Billie Joe matures and how she learns from the hard times. Karen Hesse did a beautiful job dealing with this as we see the range in the girl's emotions and the times when she hides how she feels. Teens need to learn how to survive. On a scale of one to ten it is in the middle

Discuss the "Cinderella" fairytale through its appropriation, how it is affected by its culture, a different version and Bettelheim's psychoanalytical reading

646 words - 3 pages approaches of different storytellers.The result of this is a variety of appropriations of the text, to suit the cultural and social norms of the time. One example of this is Andy Tennant's film "Ever After". In this film version, Cinderella is Danielle who has a wicked stepmother and stepsisters, but in no way is she in need of rescuing; saving herself from her horrible family and the prince from gypsies. She overcomes hardship, marries prince

Meaning, Understanding, and the Politics of Interpretation

2599 words - 10 pages that they have understood or grasped their texts without having any kind of intermediary placed between themselves and their texts, regardless of whether this intermediary takes the form of an external authority (in Spinoza's sense) or an interpretation (in Derrida's sense). In the course of the paper I draw upon Michael Dummett's philosophy of language in order to critique the "humpty-dymptyism" of the interpretationist school. I place myself

Comparitive Analysis of the movie "Ever After" and "Cinderella"

3119 words - 12 pages Clothing plays a role in every person's life; often people are judged and defined by the types of things they wear. In "Cinderella: Not So Morally Superior," Elisabeth Panttaja claims that Cinderella succeeded in marrying the prince not because she was more patient than her stepsisters and stepmother, but because she was wittier and utilized the magical powers offered to her, namely an enchanted dress. In "A Feminist's View of 'Cinderella

Neotextual narrative and the interpretation of Stonehenge

2030 words - 8 pages ] critique of structuralist feminism is a self-sufficient whole. It could be said that any number of theories concerning the role of the poet as reader may be discovered. 3. Eco and textual discourse If one examines subcultural sublimation, one is faced with a choice: either accept neoconstructivist rationalism or conclude that the significance of the writer is significant form. The example of constructivism depicted in Eco's The Island of the Day

Dream Interpretation of the Unconscience and Subconscience

741 words - 3 pages An important procedure for gaining data on the unconscious and subconscious mind is through the analysis of dreams (Butcher, 2013). While sleeping, a person’s mental defensive filters are lowered. Therefore, forbidden desires such as sex and emotional feelings of repression may find themselves into a clients dream. The mind interprets this unconscious cognition and disguises these feelings into symbolism. (2013) This is why dream interpretation

Similar Essays

A Critique Of “ ‘Cinderella’ : A Story Of Sibling Rivalry And Oedipal Conflicts By Bruno Bettelheim

1535 words - 7 pages offering to the Lord was rejected while Abel’s was accepted. This caused him great agony, but he wasn't the only one. According to Bruno bettelheim, the fairy tale “Cinderella” encompasses the ideas of sibling rivalry as well as the agonies and hopes that correspond with it. Sibling rivalry, “Cinderella’s” hidden meanings, and the Oedipal period are the focal points of Bettelheim's essay “ ‘Cinderella’ : A Story of Sibling Rivalry and Oedipal

A Critique Of “ ‘Cinderella’ : A Story Of Sibling Rivalry And Oedipal Conflicts By Bruno Bettelheim

1771 words - 7 pages of Abel when his offering to the Lord was rejected while Abel’s was accepted. This caused him great agony, but he wasn’t the only one. The fairytale “Cinderella” encompases the ideas of sibling rivalry as well as the agonies and hopes that correspond with it. In the essay: “ ‘Cinderella’: A Story of Sibling Rivalry and Oedipal Conflicts”’, Bruno Bettelheim discusses how Cinderella is a story about the difficulties of sibling rivalry and the

A Critique Of Jakob And Wilhelm Grimm's Cinderella

779 words - 4 pages was more beautiful than they? Could that be a form of jealousy? They stripped her of all of her pretty clothes and her bed, and forced her to wear an old bedgown and wooden shoes and sleep amongst the ashes. This is how she came to be known as “Cinderella.” The only thing Cinderella wanted was to be a part of this new family, and was denied this by all, including her own father who was either unaware of treatment that she was enduring or had

Misleading Translation Of Freud's Work As Presented In Bettelheim's Book, Freud And Man’s Soul

613 words - 2 pages “Freud and Man’s Soul”, by Bruno Bettelheim, is the authors attempt to clear up inadequacies and errors of Freud’s research and writings after being translated to English. Bettelheim, with much of the same childhood background as Freud, studied Freud’s work at the University of Vienna. He later moved to the United States and became the director of the University of Chicago’s Orthogenic School. After reading Freud’s work in English he found the