Cultural Differences As Described By Jhumpa Lahiri

674 words - 3 pages

The greatest obstacle faced by people from different cultures is the difference in what they value. Some cultures value religious customs and tradition while others value freedom and individuality. It is sometimes hard for people from different cultures to form relationships when they don't have the same idea of what is right and what is wrong. Jhumpa Lahiri, describes many of these obstacles in the book titled, Interpreter of Maladies.In the story Interpreter of Maladies, the relationship between an American woman and an Indian man falls apart because of two things, the man learns something about the woman that he finds unacceptable and the woman insults the man's profession. Mrs. Das, an American woman, is in India to see the country with her family. Mr. Kapsi is a tour guide for the family and is also an interpreter in a doctor's office. They become friends very quickly and they both think to themselves that the friendship could become something more. At the end of their tour, Mrs. Das tells Mr. Kapasi that one of her children doesn't belong to her husband. The child actually belongs to one of his good friends, and her husband does not know. She asks Mr. Kapasi for help because he has an important job as an interpreter. Mr. Kapasi is surprised in two ways. He discovers that she isn't at all what he thought. Instead, she is, "a woman not yet thirty, who loved neither her husband no her children, who had already fallen out of love with life" (Lahiri, 66). Mr. Kapasi also feels like Mrs. Das has insulted his feelings for her, his job, and his need for honesty. When he asks her, "Is it really pain you feel, Mrs. Das, or is it guilt", Mrs. Das becomes angry because she values herself above the things Mr. Kapasi values and he cannot respect her.The idea of respect is also an important obstacle in the story, This Blessed House. Sanj does not feel that his wife, Twinkle respects him the way that she should. She doesn't do the things he asks her to do,...

Find Another Essay On Cultural Differences as Described by Jhumpa Lahiri

The Namesake: Book by Jhumpa lahiri

1322 words - 5 pages the book, shows the common things that people go through when migrating from a familiar place to the States and how difficult it is to adjust when you want to keep past traditions. I’m still sticking with my original opinion that I tend to think that books are better portrayed than movies, but this one was a close call. Works Cited Lahiri, Jhumpa. The Namesake. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2003. Print. The Namesake. Dir. Mira Nair. Prod. Mira Nair and Lydia Dean Pilcher. By Sooni Taraporevala. Perf. Kal Penn, Tabu , and Irrfan Khan. Fox Searchlight Pictures, 2007.

"Interpreter of Maladies" by Jhumpa Lahiri

1888 words - 8 pages Mina's SecretIn "Interpreter of Maladies," Jhumpa Lahiri uses Mina Das's red outfit as a way to represent an unfaithful woman, who is disconnected from her roots, and has fallen out of love with life. Her guilt from keeping a secret that one of her children is not from her husband, but from an affair, has caused her to act in a very distant and uncaring way. Through the family's visit to the Sun Temple, and the hills at Udayagiri and Khandagiri

Gogol's True Identity in The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri

836 words - 4 pages Sometimes religion can be a necessity for comfort. Over time, we may already possess our very own identities and then develop different ones after a tragedy. In order to easily move on from a plight, some sort of comfort or security is needed, whether its time, family, friends, a sport, or religion. In the novel, The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri, one can clearly see the viewpoint of how Gogol’s life over time has evolved from American to Bengali

Close Reading Analysis of The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri

1398 words - 6 pages cultural future. Without women and the ritualistic tradition of motherhood, the future of a culture lacks certainty and stability. In her novel, The Namesake, Jhumpa Lahiri offers a new approach to the often unquestioned maternal instinct, highlighting a silent outcry for a woman's much needed sense of self, apart from domestic impulse.Lahiri awakens readers to the belief and realization that some women lead deprived lives, capping their actual desires

Mrs. Sen's Displacement in America: "Interpreter of Maladies" by Jhumpa Lahiri

1372 words - 5 pages The short story, "Mrs. Sen's", by Jhumpa Lahiri, tells the experiences of Mrs. Sen, an Indian Bengali housewife, who has unhappily immigrated from Calcutta, India to the United states, due to her husbands profession. She is married to Mr. Sen, who spends the majority of his time at his work place as a mathematics professor at an American University. As a result, Mrs. Sen decides to become a babysitter for an 11-year-old- boy, named Eliot, as a

Account for the different interpretations and perspectives of the Battle of Salamis as described by Herodotus, Aeschylus and Plutarch

1177 words - 5 pages his as a history, Aeschylus' as a play, and Plutarch's as a biography. They were all affected by who they were, where they're from, and the views of the society of their time. Ultimately, Herodotus, Aeschylus and Plutarch were all giving their account of the same topic - the Battle of Salamis - and the differences in their perception and interpretation is due to each viewing the event from a different angle.

The Australian male identity is often described as anti - for example against authority, against women, against bosses, against change: "The Club" by David Williamson

1005 words - 4 pages The Club, by David Williamson, offers various portrayals of Australian men of different generations. In this play, the majority of the characters, except Ted, are either currently or previously were football players, reinforcing the dominant view in society of men as physical rather than intellectual. Within The Club there are many examples of how we typically view Australian men. These include anti-authoritarian, against women and against

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley. Compares life as Huxley described it in the World State with life in the United States today.

1138 words - 5 pages Prompt: Compare life as Huxley described it in the World State with life in the United States today.For more than half a century, science fiction writers have thrilled and challenged readers with visions of the future and future worlds. These authors offered an insight into what they expected man, society, and life to be like at some future time.A society can achieve stability only when everyone is happy, and the brave new world tries hard to

Rave is more than just a subculture as defined by the Birmingam Centre for contemporary cultural studies.

3688 words - 15 pages community created by a crowd of people, all in the same place, having the same experiences all brought together by music. The experiences that people have had being part of the rave subculture carry on into all parts of their lives and will continue to influence them as their lives progress. The lack of importance placed on social and cultural differences within the rave scene is helping today's society to become more cohesive and tolerant towards

An Analysis of the Idea of Cultural Heritage as It Is Presented by Langston Hughes, Lucille Clifton, and Colleen McElroy

1318 words - 6 pages , and feel ashamed for having been so heartless to fellow human beings. Not only this, but by stating it in the way that he did, Hughes basically certifies that this is inevitable, and therefore, it does not matter where your place is as an African American individual, you will feel the benefit while everyone else feels the shame. Clifton suggests that cultural heritage is something that must be focused on in order to be successfully embraced

Anatomy is Destiny;"Men and Women are Limited by their Biological Differences and the Social and Economic Divisions Between them are Necessary." An enquiry into British society as a Patriacrhy

2361 words - 9 pages variety of lifestyles that those in the western world are fortunate enough to be born into. The multitude of life choices available mean that women are no less held back by biological differences than men; there are very few occupations where a male or female could truly be limited to the point where they can no longer fulfil their role. Despite certain vocations being ‘traditionally’ viewed as male occupations there are really no logical

Similar Essays

The Namesake By Jhumpa Lahiri Essay

2267 words - 9 pages The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri Living in America, the Ganguli’s have the difficult choice of choosing between two dramatically different cultures. As a second generation

The Namesake By Jhumpa Lahiri Essay

1227 words - 5 pages The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri Jhumpa Lahiri in The Namesake illustrates the assimilation of Gogol as a second generation American immigrant, where Gogol faces the assimilation of becoming an American. Throughout the novel, Gogol has been struggling with his name. From kindergarten to college, Gogol has questioned the reason why he was called Nikhil when he was a child, to the reason why he was called Gogol when he was in college. Having a

The Namesake By Jhumpa Lahiri Essay

1623 words - 6 pages The Namesake, presents the life of Ashima Ganguli, who has been transported from India to America with grace and compassion. This story by Jhumpa Lahiri, is an allegory establishing an identity with using symbolic meaning between two cultures that intersect. The themes throughout the story refer to immigrant experiences, the conflict of cultures, the contrast of assimilation and the connection between generations. The Namesake, opens the

Once In A Lifetime, By Jhumpa Lahiri

1781 words - 7 pages “Like many immigrant offspring I felt intense pressure to be two things, loyal to the old world and fluent in the new, approved of on either side of the hyphen” (Lahiri). Jhumpa Lahiri, a Pulitzer Prize winner, describes herself as Indian-American, where she feels she is neither an Indian nor an American (Lahiri). Lahiri feels alienated by struggling to live two lives by maintaining two distinct cultures. Lahiri’s most of the work is recognized