Cultural Regeneration Causing Problems Of Social Exclusion.

3478 words - 14 pages

IntroductionUrban renewal and social exclusion are two very complex and imperative concepts that cannot be separated. The 21st century has seen a rise in the number of urban regeneration projects across the globe. There has been a lot of research conducted on this subject resulting in a substantial amount of literature published in various countries. The majority of research on this subject has mainly focused on urban renewal with a particular emphasis on how to solve problems of older parts of towns and cities (Khakee et al., 1999). Research indicates that urban renewal has its own merits and inherent problems which need clearly defined strategies to solve them. This nuisance has led to shift form urban renewal to urban regeneration. Instead of merely focusing on the development of land and properties in inner cities and towns, urban regeneration now encompasses social and economic concerns for the residents of the affected areas (Khakee et al., 1999).An analysis of urban renewal policies in the United Kingdom clearly identifies five different stages in the formulation of these policies. These stages include clearing largely unused urban landfills, making improvements to the existing housing infrastructure, renewal of dilapidated houses and apartments, eliminating inner city housing disparities and formulating renewal strategies that specifically incorporate economic and social development. The main goal of these policies is to address social exclusion can be caused by cultural regeneration strategies. Khakee et al. (1999) defines social exclusion as a failure of the legal and democratic system, the labour market, the welfare state system and the family and community system.A number of regeneration projects in Western Europe including the United Kingdom have failed to tackle social exclusion issues of ethnic minorities living in these urban areas and this concluded in poverty and crime. It is against this background that this paper critically analyses how cultural regeneration strategies can cause as well as cure social exclusion. The Temple Bar Regeneration project in Dublin will be used as a case study. The paper will use a triangulation of a review of available literature in urban regeneration and lessons learnt from the failure of Dublin's Temple Bar Regeneration project.Background to the Temple Bar Regeneration ProjectThe project focused on the culture-led regeneration strategies which have since been adopted by many other regeneration projects across the world. The Temple Bar area was historically significant to the people of Dublin who wanted to preserve it in its original state. Despite strong opposition from residents of Dublin and other stakeholders, regeneration a plan to develop the area as a tourist and cultural centre was given the go ahead by the authorities. The initial plans for the project took into the consideration the future needs of the community and included important aspects such as recreational parks, pedestrian friendly...

Find Another Essay On Cultural Regeneration causing problems of social exclusion.

Social Problems of the Troubles in Ireland

2263 words - 9 pages Social Problems of the Troubles in Ireland For about 150 years Ireland and neighboring countries have struggled with social controversy and segregation that has consumed society and its views, which have been labeled as the “Troubles”. Ireland has struggled to become peaceful and accept the ties it has to the United Kingdom. In every country there is hate, wars, and events that cause the population to raise up arms and try to get their points

The Problems Accompanying the Use of Social Media by Teenagers

1508 words - 6 pages to become part of people’s everyday lives. Along with the widespread of technology today, various people of all ages throughout the world have started to log onto social media sites. The most prominent users of social media have been shown to be adolescents. As a result of the excessive use of social media, adolescents have encountered problems such as internet bullying (“cyberbullying”), privacy concerns, and internet addiction. One

Legalization of Drugs Fails to Resolve Social Problems

1113 words - 4 pages in their effects on the human psyche, can we say with a straight face that there will be no increase in such crimes (and the resultant financial effects) with legalization?   The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism states that in 1992, $18.8 billion was spent on health care services for alcohol problems, of which $13.2 billion was for alcohol-induced health problems such as cirrhosis and trauma (due to falls

Overview of Social Structural Explanations and Cultural Explanations

1672 words - 7 pages is in direct contrast with what many conservatives see as the root cause of societal programs, and that is they see certain cultural norms within our society which they believe lead to said societal issues. While this is somewhat of a generalization of the explanations these different ideological views use towards understanding major social problems, it is what we typically see from both groups. However, as I have learned over the course of my

Social and cultural aspects in the story of an hour

1120 words - 5 pages Social and Cultural Aspects in The Story of an Hour An independent woman, Louise Mallard, receives the news that her husband had lost his life in a tragic train accident. Louise cries dramatically, as many other women would. “She wept at once, with sudden wild abandonment, in her sister’s arms.” (Chopin, 15) Mrs. Mallard then went alone to her room. After the devastating news had the opportunity to sink in, she realizes that maybe this was a

Social, Historical and Cultural Contexts of Pride and Prejudice

1973 words - 8 pages Social, Historical and Cultural Contexts of Pride and Prejudice Introduction: In Pride and Prejudice we see the ups and downs of many different relationships and the growing obsession of Mrs Bennet to get her five daughters married to wealthy handsome young men. The novel is based on love, with marriage resulting in some cases. In the 19th century there weren't many positions for work for middle or upper class women

Cultural Determinants Are Key to the Process of Determining Health Problems and Disease Causes

1333 words - 6 pages of Dr. Farmer, an extraordinary epidemiologist, a concise understanding of disease and data interpretation in practice was gleaned. Cultural determinants are key to the process of determining health problems and disease causes in order to improve overall population health effectively and efficiently. Works Cited Hruschka, DJ., & Hadley, C. (2008). A Glossary of Culture in Epidemiology. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health

Race and the Census: Effect on the Social Context of Cultural and Social Identity

2049 words - 8 pages The focus of this research study is to explore the construct of race in the census survey and the effect that it has on the social context of both cultural and social identity. These changes are based on the evolving landscape of the population as it pertains to the characteristics of its people. The Census was first administered in the 1790 and would take place every ten years . Its main purpose was to better respond to the needs of its

The Contribution of Social, Cultural, and Family Environment to the Development of Eating Disorders

2135 words - 9 pages Analyse the extent to which the social, cultural and family environment may contribute to the development of eating disorders. Eating disorders have been found through centuries of doctors records. Some as far back as the seventeenth century through Morton (1694) descriptions of the symptoms of eating disorders during this period in time. Despite this eating disorders were only formally known as a disorder until 1980 when it was

Discussion of the Importance of the Social and Cultural Context Where Child Language Acquisition is Concerned

3568 words - 14 pages Discussion of the Importance of the Social and Cultural Context Where Child Language Acquisition is Concerned Beginning with Elene Lieven’s review of the importance of the environment for language learning, discuss the importance of the social and cultural context where child language acquisition is concerned. Environment According to Elena Lieven, the roles played by brothers and sisters, and other children and

What Contributions have Migrants Made to the Economic, Social and Cultural Development of Australia?

1122 words - 4 pages Migrants have made many contributions to the economic, social and cultural development of Australia. From the government projects such as the snowy mountains scheme to the establishment of the publicly paid television channel SBS; migrants have been one of the main reasons as to why our country's economy has increased immensely. Migrants have developed Australia's society by giving it a good image, educating people and being in the media. Also

Similar Essays

The Causes Of Social Exclusion Essay

3111 words - 12 pages The Causes of Social Exclusion Social exclusion refers to inequality in society, where individuals or groups may be cut off in involvement with the wider society. Social exclusion can take a number of forms. An individual or group may be excluded due to their age cohert, gender, race, educational background, neighbourhood, class and more. A class in social terms can be defines as a large scale grouping of people

Social Exclusion Of The Aboriginal Population Of Australia

1926 words - 8 pages Another issue which commonly affects the Aboriginal population, inhibiting the experience of good health, is culture clash which consistently lead to social exclusion and societal assimilation. Urquhart (2009) identifies social exclusion as the fourth of ten social determinants of health and is often a result of culture clash. It is very important to recognise that culture clash is a cultural issue which gives rise to certain discrepancies that

Examine The Concept Of 'social Exclusion' Linked To Irish Identity

1897 words - 8 pages Within this essay I am going to explore and examine the concept of social exclusion linked to Irish identity in Britain. I will be exploring the social conditions of the Irish people living in Britain because if first and second generation Irish people are taken together, the Irish form the largest ethnic group in Britain today. In fact, studies have shown that the size of the Irish-born population in Britain has remained stable overall since

The Effect Of Ayslum Policy On Social Exclusion In The Uk

3362 words - 13 pages state but a process. In December 1997, the Social Exclusion Unit (SEU) was set up for two years in the first instance, based in the Cabinet Office and reporting to the Prime Minister. The aim of the Unit is to develop coordinated policies to address social exclusion, described as joined-up policies for joined-up problems. It has no spending budget, since its purpose is to make recommendations to the contributory government