Daisy Buchanan: The True Inhabitant Of The Wasteland In "The Great Gatsby"

625 words - 3 pages

Daisy it the true inhabitant of the wasteland because of the fact that even though she’s being betrayed by her husband and has been throughout their entire marriage she still stays with Tom even though Daisy has another man, Gatsby, that truly loves her and would be loyal to Daisy. The only reason why she doesn’t go to Gatsby is because Daisy wants to keep her social standing with “old money” even though Daisy might be unhappy having the last name of Buchanan and having the old money that comes with that last name means more to Daisy then being happy with Gatsby even though he has “New money”. So Daisy is the true inhabitant of the wasteland because she essentially wastes her life away, Daisy has the opportunity to better her life but because her ego gets in the way she stays in the same situation she’s always been in and will always be in. Daisy even comments in chapter one how she hopes her daughter is a “beautiful fool” she says this because in that time woman would ignore certain things to stay away from tension-filled situations, like if Daisy were to confront Tom about him cheating on her. So from breaking down that quote in chapter one you can see just how much an affect society has on Daisy.
Throughout the book we are shown how careless Daisy really is, with how she just gets up and moves with Tom to an unknown place and doesn’t bother to tell anyone who might care about her where she’s going or how to get a hold of her, and when she runs over Myrtle she doesn’t bother to even stop the car because she knows whatever happens due to her wealth Daisy would be able to get out of it and that’s her mentality throughout the book. So Daisy not only essentially wastes away her life by staying in a...

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