Dangerous Classes Of New York Essay

1240 words - 5 pages

“We do the same thing as y’all. ‘Cept when we do it, it’s "Oh, my God, these kids is animals!" Like it’s the end of the world comin’.”
--Namond, HBO’s The Wire

Young black men crowd the corners of Baltimore. They are all hard talk, hard jaws, and crisp white t-shirts as big as sails—strapped. One precocious boy witnesses a shootout near a drug lord’s stash house and takes up sticks to play guns ‘n’ robbers. His trajectory is as follows: he graduates from sticks and piss-balloons, to g-packs and real guns, to taunting cops with brown bags of excrement, to housecats and lighter fluid, to bold, cold-blooded murder. In the words of social reformer Charles Loring Brace, this boy is one of the dangerous class—an undisciplined, delinquent youth. A creation of David Simon’s for HBO’s crime drama, The Wire, the character of Kenard may be a fictionalization, but his presence adds to the much-praised realism of the series. There really are young boys like Kenard that exist on the streets of American cities—falling into the easy and familiar trap of the drug industry. The Wire makes a point to follow the tread of Baltimore’s youth throughout all of its five seasons, introducing the topic of juvenile delinquency to the considerable range of social issues the show discusses. The Wire almost flawlessly represents the factors which cause a young person to “defect”— from the failings of the city school district, a difficult home life, or the struggle of homelessness, to the surrounding environmental influences that arise from life in the city of Baltimore. However, while The Wire and its examination of causalities does many things for the discussion of Juvenile Delinquency on the whole—taking the conversation to levels no other scripted television show has ever attempted—the series sometimes neglects or fails to fully engage with the nuanced issues surrounding juvenile delinquency in America today.
The origin of juvenile delinquency in America is not a particularly vast or convoluted tale, but the history is in constant conversation with the events of The Wire and American current events. Yet, since its formal inception at the end of the nineteenth century, the measures for legitimate sanctions of juvenile delinquency have shifted. Where for a time sanctions delinquency relied solely upon a formal pronouncement from the juvenile court system, society has witnesses an increase in informal sanctions of delinquency which take place outside of the juvenile courts, as well as a dangerous rise in sanctions that result from false perceptions of juvenile delinquency. The former two [sanctions] have given rise to the well-argued Labeling Theory, which endeavors to explain criminal recidivism. The eye of the Wire passes over these shifts in delinquency sanctions but doesn’t stay long enough to inform its audience of their destructive force or of how juvenile delinquency truly functions in the American landscape.

I.

“…the class of a large city most dangerous to...

Find Another Essay On Dangerous Classes of New York

Sidewalks of New York City Essay

1606 words - 6 pages legally maintaining making living, those men have to develop many relationships with people of different classes: police officers, pedestrian, local residents etc.. In communicating with other members of sidewalk subculture, those men can find supports, mental helps (from "old heads" or "mentors" like Hakim) and encouragements to avoid giving up. Thus it's not so surprising that every new "generation" entering sidewalk receives helps

Biography of Yonkers, New York Essay

888 words - 4 pages Thirty to forty years ago Yonkers once was a beautiful city and a place full of opportunities. As time progresses, Yonkers, New York has now turned into a city of disaster, and is becoming more and more difficult to handle. The levels of gang violence and crime have dramatically risen through out the nineteen seventies until present time. Houses were extremely cheap in the seventies, and the cost of buying a house or renting an apartment have

Analysis of Gangs of New York

2109 words - 8 pages Gangs of New York PAGE 4 Analysis of Gangs of New YorkHUM/150: Introduction to Film StudiesWorkshop 5Word Count: 2083Analysis of Gangs of New YorkIn 2002, Martin Scorsese teamed up with Miramax Films to direct Gangs of New York, a film he had dreamed of making since the 1970s. With a $97 million budget, the film was a box-office flop, grossing only $190 million worldwide. Nevertheless, Gangs of New York earned 10 Academy Award nominations, and

The New York Conspiracy Trials of 1741

856 words - 4 pages In 1741 New York, New York was one of the largest ports in British North America. (Zabin, 7) The Dutch founded New York in 1624. The Dutch founded New York to be used as a trading post named New Amsterdam. (Zabin, 7) The first slaves were brought to New York in 1626. As time progressed, elite whites moved inward, away from the water. The land near the water and ports was inhabited by poor whites, sailors and slaves. In 1741 there was a

The New York Shutdown of August 2003

3361 words - 14 pages Introduction Lin et al (2011) indicate that on the 14th of August 2003, New York was engulfed in a number of a series of power generation interruptions which subsequently triggered a shutdown for protective purposes. Although the shutdown was intended for good purpose, million of New Yorkers in the Northeastern US experienced over 31 hours of blackout beginning on August 14th 4.11 p. m. DeBlasio et al (2004) attest to the arguments of Lin et al

Channels of Distribution- New York Times

554 words - 2 pages The New York Times Channels of DistributionNews and information is vital to community awareness. Establishing and maintaining credibility in the delivery of news and information is an ongoing task. Capturing new customer use of the New York Times is the focus of the following paper. An overview of strategic multi-platform, multi-channel approach to grow both their national/global Knowledge Audience business and our Local Market business will be

Irving Washington, The History of New York

1323 words - 5 pages Irving Washington was born in 1783 in New York into a large family where he was the youngest of eleven children. He started his career from a law office feeling that it was a job not to his heart content. Being light-hearted and sardonic in his nature he attempted to write for the journal of his brother Peter called “The Morning Chronicle”. Later Irving and Peter thought of creating a high-quality literary mockery. Originally the text

Striped Bass of New York State

917 words - 4 pages The striped bass (Morone saxatilis), also known as the striper or rockfish, can be identified essentially by the darkish horizontal bands across its silver body. Striped bass can grow to over four feet long (122 centimeters), weigh over fifty pounds (23 kilograms) and live up to thirty years. The New York State record for a striped bass is a 76 pound fish (34 kilograms) caught off the coast of Montauk in 1981. The biggest striped bass on record

Gangs of New York History vs. Hollywood

1125 words - 5 pages      The movie begins in New York, in 1843, with a gang fight. Bill “the butcher” Cutting’s gang of “nativists” have challenged the “dead rabbits” (a gang of mostly Irish immigrants) to a fight to settle once and for all who is the most powerful gang in the area. After an intense battle the “nativists” win by killing the leader of the “dead rabbits”, also Amsterdam’s (the main character’s) father.   &nbsp

The Statue of Liberty New York

1268 words - 5 pages to provide the funds. Pulitzer's campaign of harsh criticism was successful In motivating the people of America to donate.Financing for the pedestal was completed in August 1885, and the pedestal construction was finished in April 1866. The statue was completed in France in July 1884 and arrived in New York Harbor in June of 1885 on board the French frigate "Isere" which transported the Statue of Liberty from France to the United States. In

Gangs of New York and Naturalism

1072 words - 5 pages In the beginning, it seems unlikely that Gangs of New York will be an example of naturalism. Unlike To Build a Fire or Open Boat, the whole story of Gangs of New York happens in a civilized area, and nobody is in a case of danger because of the nature. Naturalism is implicit in this article. But being implicit does not mean it is ineffective. Instead, the idea of naturalism within this article is more confound than other two stories we studied

Similar Essays

A Review Of "A Dangerous Business". Lowell Bergmann & David Barstow. New York Times. Pbs Frontline. 2003

919 words - 4 pages David H. Dallas (author)English 111: Writing IIClarion Universtiy of PASeptember 29, 2003A Review of "A Dangerous Business"The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the PBS television show Frontline, and the New York Times collaborated on a project which resulted in a series of New York Times articles entitled "Dangerous Business" and a documentary series of the same name that aired in January 2003. The nine-month investigation in particular dealt

Bank Of New York Essay

2783 words - 11 pages Executive Summary Founded in 1784, the Bank of New York is the oldest bank in the United States. It was the first bank in New York that opened just months after the departure of British troops from American soil in lower Manhattan. During that time period the monetary system was complex and confusing. The founders decided that The Bank of New York wasn’t going to be a common institution that capitalized on land; it focused on specie, which is

Another Side Of New York Essay

1515 words - 7 pages while as the city is too well known. I can’t take my eyes of those tall buildings and those signature yellow cabs as I walk along the street. This is my first trip to New York City. It’s my dream city, however it turns out to be a noisy, busy, and crazy city where there’s noise and people everywhere. I got to go to New York thanks to Linh N., who asked me if I want to join her as her school has a trip to New York. We, two young girls who barely

Diverse Population Of New York Essay

804 words - 4 pages New York City, The city that never sleeps is the largest city in the word. It’s ethnically diverse population is made up of immigrants from all over the world. People come here in pursuit of better job, education and life. Today, New York is all that and more, thanks to the discovery of law, order and technology. Everything about New York is grand it is a fast developing society. Few years ago, New York was nothing like what it is today. It