Dante's Inferno: The Levels Of Hell

1244 words - 5 pages

Dante's Inferno: The Levels of Hell
Level One
According to Dante, there are various levels in hell. The first level in Hell is called Limbo. All the individuals who die before being baptized and those who live as virtuous pagans are condemned to spend the rest of eternity at this level. The people being referred to in this level are those who die before accepting Christianity. All the individuals who die non-Christians, including philosophers who typically do not associate themselves with any religion are going to be condemned to this level for eternity. Some of the examples that provided by Dente include famous philosophers like Socrates and Plato. This level is therefore the least severe in terms of punishment and is the farthest from Satan.
Level Two
The second level is known as lust and consists of the desperate and the despondent. All the sinners who will be found to be guilty of lust will be condemned to this level for eternity. The souls of all the individuals found guilty of this sin will be scattered and blown about without any hope of rest. In this level, people will be subjected to eternal unrest and hopelessness. This level is the second farthest circle from Satan and is slightly harsher than the first one, but is not as cruel as the other circles that follow.
Level Three
The third level consists of gluttons who will be forced to eat and lie down in vile places. In addition, the gluttons will also be subjected to freezing slush, which is allegedly similar to the harsh environment subjected to pigs. The character considered to be the head of this group of gluttons is Cerberus. The conditions at this level will be like clumps of mud and other deplorable areas. The gluttony level will be harsher than the previous two levels and this means that the level of torture subjected to the culprits will also be higher. In addition, the surroundings will be characterized by dirt, filth and other bad states. The gluttons will be subjected to states similar to those that pigs experience in this world.
Level Four
The fourth level will consist of misers and spendthrifts who will be subjected to roll stones to crash them completely. Since they are used to abusing material goods, they will be subjected to stones crashing against each other. Avaricious and prodigal individuals will not be counted among the righteous, but will instead be subjected to banging rocks for eternity. This will be a punishment for spoiling the goods in this world. One of the supernatural beings perceived as a possible leader in this category of people is Plutus, the Greek god. The Greek god is perceived to be the luminary of all spendthrifts and misers, and this god will lead all its followers towards this crash. This level will be more severe in terms of punishment than all the other preceding levels.
Level Five
The fifth level allegedly consists of the individuals guilty of wrath and sullenness. The wrathful are regarded as those who fight each other and they...

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