David Fincher Analysis

1249 words - 5 pages

“Entertainment has to come hand in hand with a little bit of medicine, some people go to the movies to be reminded that everything’s okay. I don’t make those kinds of movies. That, to me, is a lie. Everything’s not okay.” - David Fincher. David Fincher is the director that I am choosing to homage for a number of reasons. I personally find his movies to be some of the deepest, most well made, and beautiful films in recent memory. However it is Fincher’s take on story telling and filmmaking in general that causes me to admire his films so much. This quote exemplifies that, and is something that I whole-heartedly agree with. I am and have always been extremely opinionated and open about my views on the world and I believe that artists have a responsibility to do what they can with their art to help improve the culture that they are helping to create. In this paper I will try to outline exactly how Fincher creates the masterpieces that he does and what I can take from that and apply to my films.
It can be argued that most of David Fincher’s films share stylistic similarities in narrative and story more than any other way. This is a very interesting claim considering that Fincher does not write his own screenplays, yet most of his movies deal with similar overall themes and characters. This can be best illustrated by looking at films from different points in Fincher’s career. Fight Club is a film that heavily criticizes materialism, capitalism, and even religion at some points. In fact, mostly everything that Tyler Durden says is largely anti-western culture in general. Until the very end of the movie, society is in some ways the largest antagonist in the story. Se7en also shares a similar distaste for society. In Se7en both Detective Somerset and John Doe say very similar things about how society and human-kind is gradually decaying because of its acceptance of small, yet life altering sins. The unnamed any-city is always viewed as a decaying, dirty, trash ridden wasteland full of crime and scum. Finally, in The Social Network, a much more recent Fincher film, Fincher takes a social media outlet that most every person uses at least once a day in Facebook and reveals the corruption and backstabbing that led to its success. Many critics have cited The Social Network as a defining film of the current generation, showing how much it reflects society at large. Yet this film does not show a story full of good people, rather it exposes the irony that a person such as Mark Zuckerberg, who repeatedly proves that he does not know how to relate to other people, created the main mode of communication for the entire planet. Yet upon further inspection, Facebook in many ways has left us all less social than before, instead of calling a person and hearing their voice on their birthday, we now send him or her an impersonal “Happy Birthday” post on their wall. Fincher causes the audience to question if this is because of Zuckerberg’s character, or lack thereof....

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