David Kirby’s Film, Gattaca And Aldus Huxley’s, Book Brave New World

1492 words - 6 pages

Dystopia’s Robotic Appearances
In Dystopias, appearances often dictate society rankings and values. By defining an “ideal” or perfect appearance in a dystopia, judgment is made. The perfect appearance is superior and so divisions are made between people who meet the ideal and who do not fit (Caste systems). In our society, a similar dystopia is created by the control media has over the ideal facial and body images. Creating a generic look leads to a world that does not value individuality and is oppressive, exactly what a dystopia proves to be. Dystopias promote the ideology of a single perfect appearance through which a beauty caste system is created, and the loss of individual identity occurs, similar to the media’s control of one exemplary body image in our society.
One way in which dystopias take imperfect appearances away is creating images of appearances that are identical...Examples of such dystopian societies are societies in Brave new world and Gattaca. In David Kirby’s film, Gattaca and Aldus Huxley’s, book Brave New World people are made through genetic engineering meaning there is little variety in the children being produced. Children produced through sexual union look like and will have all the imperfections of the parents and grandparents. According to a literary criticism writer of the film, Kirby “would be a first step toward Gattaca like future of made-to-order babies, scrubbed clean of diseases and endowed with sparkling blue eyes—a world in which eugenics is just another branch of science.” (Kirby) In Gattaca we see that dystopias take away individuality by making people look identical. Even though all people appear attractive and are disease free, people that look the same without any unplanned imperfections actually create dystopia. In our society, media subtly controls the way the men and are supposed to appear by constantly projecting images that are uniform in certain roles. In dystopias the there is usually a strong male lead character. . To be socially “successful” in our society and be of high caste in appearance, we have to be a certain weight, and have a certain look of appealing facial feature. According to PhD specialists Lindsay and Lexie Kite “media’s definition of an attractive woman looks like: she’s tall, young, usually white, has long, flowing hair, is surgically enhanced, blemish-free and very thin.” (Beauty Redefined) Like in dystopia, media portrays “ one” ideal image of beauty in which people try to achieve this goal, however it creates a division between people. Further significant psychological damage is done when young women and men resort to violence toward themselves and surgery to achieve the ideal appearance. A report done on Aldous huxley’s novel says “Brave New World depicts a dystopian world in which caste systems define one’s role within society; the family unit has been terminated, and superficiality/recreational sex/heavy drug use have become revered”. (Oxy.org) Superficiality has...

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