This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Dealing With The Consequences Of Life In Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe

736 words - 3 pages

Dealing With the Consequences of Life

In Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, Robinson faces the biggest and longest challenge of his life. As Robinson attempts to find his role in life, he travels around the world to experience what he might deem worthy to live for. He takes comfort in material things such as wealth and possessions, which is what gets him in trouble over time. Robinson was told to take the middle path in life, but choosing the high path instead, Robinson was separate from everything considered materialistic in his social life. Robinson Crusoe has to face the consequences of his self-created ordeal and handle any challenges that face him.
In the theme of man versus self, Robinson is constantly being faced with religious doubt and the difficulty of making essential life decisions based on how to live his new life. His trials begin when a storm destroys the ship he is sailing on and forces him to become a castaway on the seemingly deserted island. Resorting to his natural mindset, the first thing Robinson does when he gains consciousness is to find the ship and take as much as he can from the storage to support himself through choosing items for what he sees as essential. As he woke up from a night of rest, the only thought in Robinsons mind was, “It was in vain to sit still and wish for what was not to be had, and this Extremity rouz’d my application” 45. Robinson is thinking of the things that he knows he wants, but cannot have. He has to allocate his time searching the ship wreck for things he knows he needs, but will find little that he truly wants. As time goes on, Robinson began to question his lack of religious thought, and hence the theme of man versus self through religion is created. After a bad dream he looks inwardly and says to himself, “I do not remember that I had in all that Time one Thought that so much as tended either to looking upwards toward God, or inwards towards a reflection upon my own ways” 82. As he sets up his life on the island, ensuring his survival one step at a time, Robinson does not have much time...

Find Another Essay On Dealing With the Consequences of Life in Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe

Alexander Pope’s An Essay on Man and Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe

2855 words - 11 pages Alexander Pope’s An Essay on Man and Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe The theme of "man’s relationship to God and the universe" presented in Epistle 1 of Alexander Pope’s "An Essay on Man" complements Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe. Crusoe is an inconsistent character who turns to God whenever he is in need, yet fails to maintain respect for nature and for his fellow man. In the first year of Robinson Crusoe’s solitary life on the island, he

Character Transformation in Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe

1266 words - 5 pages Character Transformation in Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe "Nothing can describe the confusion of thought which I felt when I sunk into the water; for though I swam very well, yet I could not deliver myself from the waves so as to draw breath, till that wave having driven me, or rather carried me, a vast way on towards the shore and, having spent itself, went back, and left me upon the land almost dry, but half dead with the water I took

Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe and the Virtues of Protestantism

1639 words - 7 pages or illusory. It seems to me that Defoe was concerned with religious toleration for more than selfish reasons; he saw religious toleration as a moral responsibility of all Christians, including Catholics and Protestants, and as the only resolution to the conflict between the personal and public realms of religion. So Robinson Crusoe turns out to be just as concerned about toleration in general as it is about the virtues of Protestantism. At least in Robinson Crusoe, Defoe turned out to be fairly open-minded.

The Religious Dimension of Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe

1198 words - 5 pages character attractions of the stories.  The Bible for him appears to be something like a Dale Carnegie handbook of maxims to keep the work on schedule and to stifle any possible complaints or longings for a different situation.  Still, the religious dimension is central to Robinson Crusoe.             Robinson Crusoe’s interpretation of his life links the financial success directly and repeatedly with his growth in religious awareness.  This is

Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel Defoe

840 words - 3 pages Robinson Crusoe This book report is on the story Robinson Crusoe. The book was written by Daniel Defoe. The genre of the story is adventure fiction. The book has a total of 266 pages. Robinson Crusoe, the main protagonist in the story, was born in 1632 in the city of York. He was the third son of a German merchant, and was taught very early in his life to be a man of law. Despite this, all that Robinson wanted to do was go to sea. Robinson

Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

742 words - 3 pages While the book, Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, is exciting and enjoyable to read during a raining day, there are a few peculiarities that spring into mind when reading the book. These peculiarities cast doubt on the reality of the book and a question comes to mind; could this have really happened? Some say that, because of the in-depth descriptions in the book, that it is a true account. However, Swiss Family Robinson, a story of a

Exploring Social Class in Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe and The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

1673 words - 7 pages poor. This essay will ask how Literature can reinforce dominant ideas about class and how it can also undermine them. To answer this question this essay will first focus on Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe and will then turn to The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. With Robinson Crusoe, Defoe, gives his own definition of class, according to him the world is divided into civilized people and savages. Defoe also emphasizes that the middle

Order and Disorder in "Robinson Crusoe" by Daniel Defoe

2561 words - 10 pages "Robinson Crusoe" is more than just a story about a man shipwrecked on an island. The island is paradoxical place, because it simultaneously becomes a heaven and a threat. It will overwhelm and conquer Crusoe if he does not make it his paradise. The psychological tricks are survival tactics. And as many philosophers wrote that man in this sort of state of nature was a social animal, that the bestial life of the solitary savage was insecure, and

Comparing Daniel Defoe and Robinson Crusoe

1120 words - 5 pages bit. He then sold this plantation to buy his dream boat to live and sail in. Robinson Crusoe and Daniel Defoe’s income changed extremely similar through their lives. Defoe and Crusoe where both born into a family with a decent income, however they were not rich, but at the same time they were not poor. Mid-life Crusoe ended up getting himself stranded on an island with £30. “By 1692 he (Daniel Defoe) had accumulated debts totaling approximately

Robinson Crusoe a Story by Daniel Defoe

1388 words - 6 pages island, others however were disappointed with the changes made to the movie from the original story Robinson Crusoe. Robinson Crusoe is a story of a young man who decided to disobey his father’s wishes of being a lawyer and go to sea at only nineteen. After a long boisterous trip, the ship he is on becomes wrecked in a strong storm. Although this happens he still desires to be at sea so strongly he decided that he will set out to sea once again

Greed in King Lear, by William Shakespeare, and Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel Defoe

868 words - 3 pages The play, The Tragedy Of King Lear, by William Shakespeare, and the story, Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel Defoe, are very different in various ways, from the way the story was told to how the story was set. Despite how different the stories are there was one connection that particularly stood out to me, being the greed shared by most of the main characters in both stories. Goneril, Regan, and Edmund in King Lear and Robinson Crusoe in his own story

Similar Essays

The Central Characteristics Of Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe

1178 words - 5 pages The central characteristics of a novel are essential to keeping the story alive and the reader interested. A pervasive illusion of reality, individualized and believable characters and a plausible plot are the main characteristics that are most central to the novel form (Taormina, 2005). These three things are evident in Defoe’s 1719 novel Robinson Crusoe. In the early eighteenth century, when Robinson Crusoe was written, there were no set rules

Self Interest And Greed In Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe

1386 words - 6 pages We can be defined by our actions and they have a way of revealing our true character. Robinson Crusoe, the main character in Daniel Defoe’s novel Robinson Crusoe, gets himself into many troubles because of his decisions based on self-interest and greed. Robinson Crusoe thinks very highly of himself and is very conceited which plays a big roll with getting him into many misadventures. There are many instances throughout the novel where it is

Faith, Religion And Conflict In Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe

687 words - 3 pages The novel Robinson Crusoe was written in 1719 by Daniel Defoe in London. It can be separated into three parts that include Crusoe’s life before the shipwreck, the twenty-eight years that he was stranded on an island, and his experiences after being rescued from the island. The first section of the book is basically about how Crusoe didn’t take his father’s advice in not pursuing a life at sea. He goes out to sea anyway and at first has some

Comparing Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe And Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

1459 words - 6 pages In both Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, the main characters suddenly find themselves in radically different environments than what they are used to. Robinson Crusoe finds himself shipwrecked on an uninhabited island, and Gulliver is forced onto a strange island by his wayward crew. The endings of these stories could not be more different from each other. Gulliver is tragically unable to transition back