Death Of A Salesman By Miller : Society's Alienation Of Willy Loman

856 words - 3 pages

It is often stated that society is very judgmental. It can be seen in movies, literary works, or just an everyday walk of life. Arthur Miller chooses to portray society's prejudice against the protagonist, Willy Loman, in his play, Death of a Salesman. Society, in this case, rejects Willy Loman because he isn't upper class, and because he is getting up in age. Many occurrances highlight society's judging of Willy, including him being fired, the 'spite' that he recieves from his sons, and the way he alienates himself. All of these eventually lead to the downfall of a strong, determined, but confused character.Perhaps the most defeating action that happened to Willy was the loss of his job. All he had ever been in life was a salesman, therefore it was the only trade that he was any good at. When he had the conference with Howard, he had his hopes up. Willy had regained his confidence in himself and was ready to take control of his life at a very crucial time. However, Howard crushed all of that by firing Willy, simply because he thought Willy, 'needed some rest.' Actually, Howard never intended to give Willy his job back. He was merely trying to take Willy's position because he didn't believe Willy could hack it anymore. This is a reflection of society's present day treatment of the elderly. Younger generations now, move older people into rest homes and try to keep them out of public view, for risk of embarassment. This is reflected by Howard's statement, 'I don't want you to represent us anymore.' Society's assumption of Willy's capabilities, in this case, cost him his job.A second occurrance that displayed Willy's alienation happened in his own family. Biff doesn't believe whatsoever in his father and has no hope for him at all. Biff even says in act one that his father has no character. Biff is a perfect symbol for society in the play. Biff knows his father has problems, but even as a son, 'can't get near him.' Even though he accepts his father as a fake later in life, Biff tries over and over again to reach his father and to help him, but an unseen barrier prevents Biff from doing so. Happy is the type that knows what's going on with his father, but won't try to help him. Although it is never actually said verbatum, it is obvious that Willy has some kind of mental problem that needs some attention. Yet even in his own home, he can't get any help because his family can't...

Find Another Essay On Death of a Salesman by Miller : Society's Alienation of Willy Loman

Willy Loman in Death of a Salesman

768 words - 3 pages salesman, Dave Singleman dies, all the buyers came to his funeral. All the people Dave ever knew came. There were thousands mourning his death. From that point, Willy Loman found an awesome dream which he followed the rest of his life. Willy became a salesman. Willy is the most unqualified salesman ever! He never sold a thing. Willy stops seeing the truth at one point of his life and he relies on his own lies to numb his pain. The pain of knowing

Alienation of Willy Loman in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman

686 words - 3 pages Willy's Loneliness and Alienation in Death of a Salesman  Willy Loman’s feelings of alienation and loneliness are direct psychological results of his interaction with society and the conditions that are found within it.  Although, he does not necessarily have the ability or allow himself to have the ability to define his feelings as such, they are still very much a part of his everyday existence.  This is evident in his constant bragging

Willy Loman, in the book "Death of a Salesman", by Arthur Miller, and his quest for the "American Dream."

675 words - 3 pages A Death of the American DreamThe American Dream is forever being chased, and never caught. Willy Loman, the main character, in A Death of a Salesman, by Arthur Miller chose to follow the American dream and lead the life it gave him. The American dream is the belief that through sheer hard work alone, any man can gain professional success and thus receive personal gain. The major flaw in this 'dream' is that it produces selfish individuals who

Can Willy Loman be Considered a Tragic Hero? Arthur Miller Death Of A Salesman

584 words - 2 pages Willy LomanTragic Hero?Aaron Odom"Willy Loman never made a lot of money. His name was never in the paper. He's not the finest character that ever lived." This line from Death of a Salesman is a great summation of Willy Loman. By definition, a tragic hero is the main character of a story who suffers from a tragic flaw that eventually causes his downfall. Willy's flaws consisted of his dimensia, his failure at raising his two sons the right way

Willy Loman as Tragic Hero of Death of a Salesman

1562 words - 6 pages Willy Loman as Tragic Hero of Death of a Salesman     Willy Loman, the title character of the play, Death of Salesman, exhibits all the characteristics of a modern tragic hero. This essay will support this thesis by drawing on examples from Medea by Euripedes, Poetics by Aristotle, Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, and Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, while comments by Moss, Gordon, and Nourse reinforce the thesis.             Death of Salesman

Is Willy Loman a Tragic Hero in "Death of Salesman

1813 words - 8 pages Willy Loman’s character in Death of a Salesman portrays him as a tragic hero. Willy Loman continued to want his recognition and his reputation but never forgets about his family. These characteristics describe him as a tragic hero in Death of a Salesman. Willy Loman’s tragic flow leads him to purse the idea that reputation in society has more relevancies in life than knowledge and education to survive in the business. His grand error of wanting

Death of a Salesman, By Arthur Miller, Characterization of Happy Loman

952 words - 4 pages Imagine a quiet home in Brooklyn, New York where a family lives with their two grown sons who are visiting, a strong devoted wife who keeps the family together, and an off the wall husband, whose flashbacks and lack of real self-worth lead to his suicide. This is the home where Happy Loman grew up, and returns to in the play "Death of a Salesman" by Arthur Miller. Happy Loman is an attractive male who may appear to have it all and be satisfied

Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller

1344 words - 6 pages Willy Loman, from the play Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller, exhibited the traits of a tragic hero. His disastrous qualities came prior to his foreshadowed death when he realized his existence had not panned out the way he had hoped. Mr. Loman aroused sympathy from the readers as he dedicated his life to a single cause, all while having a weakness of pride that led to his catastrophic passing. Willy was destined to pass away from the very

Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller

1685 words - 7 pages Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman is about a traveling salesman named Willy Loman who has hit a rough patch in his life. Willy seems to have a normal family, with a wife and two boys. His sons, Happy and Biff, while different, represent Willy in many ways. Willy always strived to be successful and struggled for acceptance, which also represents his sons personalities and outlooks. As Pamela Loos says, “Willy Loman fails to understand himself

Willy Loman as a Tragic Hero in Death of a Salesman

938 words - 4 pages Willy Loman as Tragic Hero in Death of a Salesman Willy Loman, the troubled father and husband in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, can be classified as a tragic hero, as defined by Aristotle in his work, Poetics. In Aristotle's Poetics, a tragic hero was defined as one who falls from grace into a state of extreme despair. Willy, as we are introduced to him, becomes increasingly miserable as he progresses from a dedicated, loving

Willy Loman as a Father in Arthur Miller's A Death of a Salesman

1298 words - 5 pages Willy Loman as a Father in Arthur Miller's A Death of a Salesman Modern society would condemn the parenting skills of Willy Loman, the father in Arthur Miller’s A Death of a Salesman, who imposes his dreams upon his two sons and preaches the value of popularity over integrity. As an unsuccessful salesman, Willy is unable to cope with his own shortcomings and valiantly attempts to find something to be hopeful for

Similar Essays

Willy Loman, A Man With A Dream. Character In "Death Of A Salesman" By Miller

1057 words - 4 pages Willy Loman: A Man With A DreamA common idea presented in literature is the issue ofthe freedom of the individual in opposition to thecontrolling pressures of society. Willy Loman, the maincharacter in Death of A Salesman by Arthur Miller,epitomizes this type of person; one who looks to his peersand co-salesman as lesser individuals. Not only was hecompetitive and overbearing, but Willy Loman sought after anideal that he could never become: the

Death Of A Salesman By Arthur Miller: Willy Loman Is Not A Tragic Hero

978 words - 4 pages Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller: Willy Loman is NOT a Tragic Hero In The Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller, it is argued weather that Willy Loman is a tragic hero. There are cases for both classifications of Willy. By definition, a tragic hero is a person born into nobility, is responsible for their own fate, endowed with a tragic flaw, and doomed to make a serious error in judgment. The tragic hero eventually falls from great

Can Willy Loman Be Considered A Tragic Hero? Death Of A Salesman By Arthur Miller

675 words - 3 pages Untitled Willy Loman Tragic Hero? Aaron Odom "Willy Loman never made a lot of money. His name was never in the paper. He's not the finest character that ever lived." This line from Death of a Salesman is a great summation of Willy Loman. By definition, a tragic hero is the main character of a story who suffers from a tragic flaw that eventually causes his downfall. Willy's flaws consisted of his dimensia, his

Willy Loman As A Tragic Hero "Death Of A Salesman" By Arthur Miller

722 words - 3 pages Willy Loman experiences many misfortunes and adversity throughout Arthur Miller's play, Death of a Salesman. The play tells of a sixty-year-old salesman who is drifting back and forth between reality and his flashbacks. The events that would come about are no doubt grim and would help designate Willy as a tragic hero. While Willy is a tragic hero, he does not fit into Aristotle's definition of one in the traditional sense. Willy is able to bring