Declaration Of Sentiments By Elizabeth Cady Stanton, And Boys And Girls By Alice Munro

1285 words - 5 pages

From the beginning of recorded history women have endured struggles and conflicts whenever they attempted to be in control of decisions that would change their lives. Men were the strong leaders and warriors, while women were the homemakers. This division of labor in family and community resulted in men having control over women’s actions. In history there were exceptional women, like Susan B. Anthony or Cleopatra, who were strong enough to disregard the cultural norms of their time and make their own decisions; but this paper is about the other girls and women. The ones who were raised to think and act in a manner that was acceptable to the dominant male in the family, whether it was a father, husband, brother, or uncle. The common theme of “The Yellow Wall-Paper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “Declaration of Sentiments” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and “Boys and Girls” by Alice Munro is the constant struggle of women to balance what is expected of them with their own expectations.
In her short story, Gilman addresses the issue of women not being allowed to make their own decisions. The speaker is suffering from postpartum depression, which in 1892 was not a recognizable illness. The speaker’s husband, John, is a physician, and he disregards what his wife tells him when making decisions regarding her care. The speaker’s response is “perhaps that is one reason I do not get well faster” (130 Gilman). John’s solution is to rent a house for the summer and isolate her from the rest of the world. He thinks she needs rest, but she thinks that her condition will get better if she had “less opposition and more society and stimulus” (131 Gilman). John says that only she can help herself out of this state, she must use her “will and self-control and not let any silly fancies run away with [her]” (136 Gilman). The speaker tells her husband that she isn’t getting any better. He brushes this off and says that she should trust him because he’s a physician and he knows what he’s doing. The speaker attempts to meet her husband’s expectations, but she feels trapped when she cannot get him to listen. So she transfers these feelings to a women she sees behind the wallpaper. Eventually she tears off the wallpaper to free the women and herself; and John finds her crawling around the room. Since the speaker could not get responses to her words, she found actions that could not be ignored.
Stanton illustrated the reality of being a woman in 1898 by writing a declaration patterned after the Declaration of Independence. In a perceptibly similar format she lists facts to support her assertion that “the history of mankind is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations on the part of man toward women…” (287 Stanton) She shows that women are tired of continually being told what to do by men. When it comes to laws and politics, men have taken away women’s voice. If a woman is married, she is “in the eye of the law, civilly dead” (288 Stanton). A woman...

Find Another Essay On Declaration of Sentiments by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Boys and Girls by Alice Munro

Lives Of Girls And Women by Alice Munro

1454 words - 6 pages In The Lives of Girls and Women, the main character Del Jordan grows from a young curious child to a woman. At a young age she is very curious about her sexuality, but is forewarned by her mother to be careful about her decisions. Del's curiosity leads her into making many wrong decisions regarding men. All these wrong decisions cause her to lose everything she had worked so hard for – her goals, her dreams ruined. Del's first relationship

Accepting Gender Role within common society: "Boys and Girls" by Alice Munro

1040 words - 4 pages Simran Maan The stereotype that society has established on the subject of the way males and females should behave is an important factor in the short story "Boys and Girls" by Alice Munro. Traditionally, men are taught to handle all of the jobs that require high amounts of physical strength. Women, on the other hand, are taught to do tasks that don't require much strength such as cook, clean and care for the family. This is society's stereotype

Gender Issues In The Story "Boys And Girls" By Alice Munro

864 words - 3 pages Through the children in the story "Boys and Girls" by Alice Murno we see how preconceived gender roles effect young children. When looking at gender roles it is interesting to see how the roles of women and men effect the outlook of our children. Working with children I see that gender issues still exist, for example parents persuade their sons to play sports and their daughters to play with dolls, and heaven forbid if either takes a

Lydia Marie Child and Elizabeth Cady Stanton

1469 words - 6 pages history of early American society, they would surely discover a male-dominated nation where women were expected to tend to their kitchen rather than share the responsibility of high government. During this time, a woman was considered the property of her husband, and was to remain compliant and silent. Nevertheless, two brilliant writers, Lydia Marie Child and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, resolved to confront and address the oppression afflicting

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

944 words - 4 pages “We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men and women are created equal.” (Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Seneca Falls Declaration). Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a suffragist and feminist. She worked towards many goals in order for women to have a say in a world where men ruled. She wrote the Declaration of Sentiments, a groundbreaking request for women’s rights. In a time in which women had no rights, Stanton, along with her partner Susan B

Comparing Elizabeth Stanton’s Declaration of Sentiments and The Women’s Bible

2354 words - 9 pages Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s Declaration of Sentiments and The Women’s Bible       Elizabeth Cady Stanton was one of the most renowned women to lead campaigns for women’s rights. Her efforts were focused on "opportunities for women, for married women’s property rights, the right to divorce, and the right to custody of children; her most radical demand was for women’s right to vote" (Davidson and Wagner-Martin 845). In general Stanton wished

Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Women's Rights

1883 words - 8 pages Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Women's Rights Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton met in March 1851, the two women not only developed a deep friendship but also helped each other prepare to change women's rights forever. Together they formed one of the most productive working partnerships in U.S. history. As uncompromising women's rights leaders, they revolutionized the political and social condition for women in

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and The Women's Rights Movement

1120 words - 4 pages women today, and will continue to impact women’s rights in future generations. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born November 12, 1815, and was the eighth child in a family of eleven children. Five of the eleven children were boys, and four of the boys died as babies. Living in the 19th century, the family’s future was focalized upon the male successors, so when Stanton’s only living brother, Eleazar, passed away after just graduating from college, her

Are Men and Women equal according to Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

639 words - 3 pages Willie BynumIntro to WritingDr. Sally Canapa25 November 2002Men and WomenAre They Equal?Are men and women equal? This question has been contemplated for many years. The answer may never be found, but it's a lot closer than it used to be. Elizabeth Cady Stanton writes in "Declaration of Sentiments and Resolution":We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Women's Rights Movement

1160 words - 5 pages Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Women's Rights Movement Elizabeth Cady Stanton was an important element of the Women’s Rights Movement, but not many people know of her significance or contributions because she has been overshadowed by her long time associate and friend, Susan B. Anthony. However, I feel that she was a woman of great importance who was the driving force behind the 1848 Convention, played a leadership role in the women’s

Alice Munro's "Boys and Girls"

1034 words - 4 pages Alice Munro's short story, 'Boys and Girls,' has a very interesting detail written into it. The narrator's brother is named Laird, which was carefully chosen by the author. Laird is a synonym for lord, which plays a important role in a story where a young girl has society's unwritten rules forced upon her. At the time of the story, society did not consider men and women equal. The name symbolized how the male child was superior in the parents

Similar Essays

Journey Motif In Boys And Girls By Alice Munro

1320 words - 5 pages that women can be self-governing, and they can survive without men controlling their every movement. Keeping that possibility in mind, this short story produces a sense of comfort in the reader, and also keeps the dreams alive with the promise of a new tomorrow. Bibliography: WORKS CITED Munro, Alice. “Boys and Girls”. Currents: Stories, Essays, Poems and Plays. Edited by McNeilly, K., Currie, N.E., New, W.H., Messenger, W.E. Scarborough, Ontario: Prentice – Hall Canada Inc., 2000. 269 - 277

Response Journal For "Boys And Girls" By Alice Munro

1257 words - 5 pages Alice Munro's "Boys and Girls" tries to view a young girl's rite of passage into womanhood, through a limited feminist perspective. The narrator battles with conformity on a 1940's Canadian Fox Farm. As this time period was still centred on male dominance, her desire to become a powerful woman wastes away when she finally submits to the rules that society has imposed on her.The story is written in first person narration and is seen through the

Awareness In Boys And Girls By Alice Munro

1064 words - 4 pages When children are faced with emotional events that challenge their ideas, they take another step on the road to being “grown up” as they discover their identity. The short story “Boys and Girls” written by Alice Munro illustrates this coming of age by allowing us to follow the development of a young girl. We follow the main character, who narrates the story, as she changes from beginning to end. As the story opens, the narrator acts like a

Story On "Boys And Girls" By Alice Munro

1201 words - 5 pages A Comprehensive Summary of Alice Munro's "Boys and Girls" Alice Munro's "Boys and Girls" is a story about a girl that struggles against society's ideas of how a girl should be, only to find her trapped in the ways of the world. The story starts out on a farm in the 1940's. The narrator is a woman who is telling the first person point of view of when she was a girl. The girl's father was a fox farmer. He was a hard working, quiet man and the girl