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Delinquency Of A Clockwork Orange Essay

1987 words - 8 pages

1. Our protagonist is a narcissistic mayhem loving juvenile who, with his not so faithful “droogs,” participates in delinquent acts throughout the novel. It appears that our protagonist has no remorse for his actions such as rape, theft, destruction of property, assault, and ultimately even murder. Once Alex is imprisoned for his murder, he turns to the bible and befriends the priest. His fondness for religion in his new surrounding seems to be a constructive outlet for Alex; however, we are soon shown that Alex fixates on the violence within the bible when he mentions that he could see himself as a roman soldier, in the height of fashion, beating Jesus as he carried his cross.
Alex is desperate to not spend his 14 year sentence in prison so he decides to volunteer himself for a radically new treatment that is said to cure people of their immoral behaviors. Alex undergoes the treatment which associates wrong-doing, maladjusted behavior with feeling ill. He therefore no longer has the capacity to make his own choices, good or bad, because if he chooses to do badly, he is overcome with a feeling of getting ill until he refrains from the action or thoughts and is forced to do proper behavior in order to keep the feelings the feelings of becoming ill at bay. This is seen several times in the book. In the first instance of Alex being forced to do no wrong, he must lick the shoe of a pesky actor who has been called upon to test the stamina and success of Alex’s treatment. Although Alex does not want to participate in submission, he has to because his thoughts of punching the gentleman make him physically ill. Likewise when the officials produce a beautiful woman, one that Alex admits he would have previously ravished, he feels ill again because of the association of the raping of women to the previous introduction of drugs that made him ill. Likewise, when the officials are pleased that Alex is no longer capable of criminal acts, he is released back into society where he visits the library and is faced with the homeless gentleman that he and his friends beat earlier in the novel. Rather than stand up for himself and fight off the elderly crowd of homeless men, Alex is incapacitated by a retching feeling due to the presence and thoughts of violence. The priest is arguing that although Alex no longer acts on his urges, it is not because he has been turned into a moral citizen, but rather he has to do the right thing or be violently ill.
Within our society I believe we bind juveniles into acceptable molds, and when a juvenile refuses to conform to that mold, they are punished or labeled. We set strict guidelines for juveniles and if broken, the child faces being an outcast to society, or even detention. However while this is a valid solution for shaping how children come into adulthood, they are sometimes set up to fail. With a new materialistic society, both parents in most cases must work, like Alex’s. Children are typically left to...

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