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Democracy In America Essay

1294 words - 5 pages

In the nineteenth century, when the influences of a recent democratic society began to spread among the Americans, the equality of gender, the role of women, and the family began to change into an individualistic culture. In the United States, democracy opens up new beliefs on equality among the role of gender. In Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville argues on how Americans were able to see the roles of gender more equally important than the Europeans. The Americans recognize the roles of the women and men important in being part as a contribution in the community. Each of the gender contains the same understanding that makes the American gender undetectable. For example, Tocqueville notice, in the United States, that the American women, “who often exhibit a masculine strength of understanding and a manly energy, generally preserve great delicacy of personal appearance and always retain the manners of women, although they sometimes show that they have the hearts and minds of men”(Tocqueville 230). Since the Americans have the democratic mentality, they are able to express in an individualistic role among themselves in society.
In the United States, the American women are more respected and have more liberty than the Europeans women. American women are able to expose themselves in the community to become more alert of their society. For example, young American women are able to confront the reality of their roles in the community and learn to gain the understanding and character to become conscious women. In the concept of marriage, the American women are the ones that present the appropriate values and customs in order to obtain stability and prosperity in the society.
The role of the family have changed in America, in which, the authority of the parent doesn’t have much influence in the child’s future. Tocqueville comment that “the distance which formerly separated a father from his sons has been lessened and that paternal authority, if not destroyed, is at least impaired” (Tocqueville 219). For example, young men are able to make their own decisions prior to their priorities and future. They become more independent from the family, especially from the father’s authority. The liberty of thoughts and decisions is what makes young men to become more individualistic. In an aristocratic society, the father is the main person that the society recognize and the children “are received by society at his hands; society governs him, he governs them” (Tocqueville 219).
In the United States, the Americans need guidance between managing individualism into a communal concentration. In America, the Americans adapted the jury to embrace the communal obligations into the citizens’ activities and the form of associations to keep the citizens aware of the political affairs of the country. These new adaptations in the democratic society had help keep citizens away from pursuing their own interests’ affairs and put the communal corporatism back into...

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