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Demoralizing Society And Regionalism In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

951 words - 4 pages

Regionalism is emphasizing the local characteristics of a region whether they are good or bad. A regional writer is someone that writes what they feel is being abused universally through a person or place, and should be fixed. Regionalism usually results in criticizing a person, place, or country through literary techniques, such as symbolism, satire, and conflict. Mark Twain is known as a regional writer to some because of the geographic region he uses that exemplifies the country as a whole. Mark Twain’s novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, falls into the regionalism category because of its universal themes of slavery, morals, and society.
Huck Finn was set in the Old South near the Mississippi River where slavery was still in effect. The whites treated African Americans poorly by calling them names, giving them poor living conditions, and lack of freedom. Slavery and racism fall into the regionalism category because not only was it adamant in the southern “slave” states but in the northern “free” states as well. An example would be, “Here’s a govment that calls itself a govment, and lets on to be a govment, and thinks it is a govment, and yet’s got to set stock-still for six whole months before it can take ahold of a prowling, thieving, infernal, white-shirted free nigger” (Twain 21). Huck’s father is criticizing the government because an intelligent and well-dressed African American had the same freedoms as him. Another example, from Jim’s point of view is “Ole Missus [Miss Watson] she pecks on me all de time, en treats me pooty rough, but she awluz said she wouldn’ sell me down to Orleans…but she could git eight hund’d dollars for me…she couldn’ resis’” (33). From a slave’s point of view, he is stating that his owner was unfair to him and this could be seen everywhere in the country. Twain’s perspective was if slavery and racism was not taken care of then there would be no hope of morals or education.
Huck gets himself and others into trouble because of the lack of morals. If society had morals in the novel then Huck would not have seen all the troubles expressed. Huck Finn is known to some as a bildungsroman, or a coming of age story. This can be shown through Huck’s lying. Huck lies continuously throughout the story and gets into extreme troubles most of the time. An example would be, “This was the most awful trouble and most dangersome I ever was in…everything was going so different from what I had allowed for; stead of being fixed I could take my own time…and see all the fun” (Twain 153). This exemplifies society’s influence on him to lie. Twain believed in learning from mistakes and lying...

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