Descartes And The Matrix Essay

823 words - 3 pages

Chris MendivilPhilosophyIsaac"The Reality of Our Existence: The Matrix and Descartes"Released in 1999, "The Matrix" managed to captivate audiences all over the world with innovative slow motion fight scenes, incredible special effects, and with the introduction of the often imitated directing technique, the "Bullet Time"; and whereas these certain components made the film incredibly successful and a cultural phenomenon, a great deal of the most important philosophical aspects of the film were often unnoticed by the general public. The Matrix is not just your typical save-the-world action movie, it is in fact, much more than that. It is a deep reflection on human kind and where we are headed, one that can easily be paralleled with the ideas of many philosophers. However, one stands out from the rest, as the film´s premise is based on one question: "What if our reality was a lie?" Definitely, it resembles Descartes. The Matrix shares parallels with the theory of the senses and the evil deceiver theory of Descartes.Descartes´ philosophical stand point about the senses is commonly used throughout "The Matrix". During his lifetime, Descartes developed a very peculiar and unique method of fundamental questioning. The method of doubt. This consisted on being skeptical about everything in the world, no matter how familiar it could be. After having some thought, Descartes came to realize that everything he knew came from his senses, which he thought were not reliable enough to determine an absolute truth, as we are often cheated by them. This led to a complete distrust toward the senses, one that is used at earlier parts of The Matrix as a plot point. This is represented on the following quote:Morpheus: (to Neo) "What is real? How do you define, 'real'? If you're talking about what you can feel, what you can smell, what you can taste and see, then real is simply electrical signals interpreted by your brain." (1999, Larry and Andy Waschowski)When Morpheus convinces Neo about what reality actually is, he often relies on the argument that what Neo senses is, in fact, just an illusion. And that he has been cheated by them his whole life. This is when similarities become clear, as Neo was deceived by his senses, and thus, he was not able to determine the absolute truth of the situation. Just as Descartes said that one cannot rely on the senses to determine a universal truth. After analyzing the conditions, it can be assured that the Matrix shares major...

Find Another Essay On Descartes and the Matrix

Friedrich Nietzsche and the Matrix Essay

1164 words - 5 pages In the film, The Matrix, the human race is forced into a “dream state” by a powerful group that controls their reality. “The Matrix” is a false reality where people live an ordinary life. However, this reality, or illusion, is being forced onto people who readily accept it as truth. This concept is where Friedrich Nietzsche’s essay, “On Truth and Lies in a Moral Sense” (1873) begins its argument. Nietzsche begins his argument by explaining

The Simple Gift, Numb, and The Matrix

1247 words - 5 pages Humans by nature, desire to have connections with other individuals in order to have a sense of self worth. Many factors contribute to these connections. The free verse novel The Simple Gift by Steven Herrick, the song Numb by Linkin Park and the film The Matrix all demonstrate that some people purposely disconnect themselves from having connections with other individuals because for them to connect they would first have to modify their

Critical Summary of "The Matrix" and Symbolism

1038 words - 4 pages "The Matrix" (1999) follows the events surrounding Neo (a.k.a Thomas Anderson) a computer hacker that is trying to find the answer to the question 'what is the Matrix?' This search leads him to Morpheus, a leader of a crew of rebels who are in search for the One, the person who will destroy the machines that are controlling the humans, therefore obliterating the Matrix and saving humankind. Neo finds that the Matrix is a computer program that

Movie the Matrix and Octavia Butler's Dawn

1597 words - 6 pages Movie the Matrix and Octavia Butler's Dawn When I first announced to my parents that I was going to marry my current wife, the first words out of my father’s mouth were, “But she’s from another culture.” My father and mother, although being generally good people, are the products of an older system of beliefs. It is the matrix I was raised with, and that dictated my earlier learning experience. Fortunately for me, I chose to risk

Movie the Matrix and George Orwell's 1984

1798 words - 7 pages Movie the Matrix and George Orwell's 1984 Neo was now surrounded by people just like him who were searching for answers as to what the Matrix is. As they were sitting around the table, Mouse turns to Neo and says, "To deny our impulses is to deny the very thing that makes us human." During the Agent Simulation Training with Morpheus, Neo follows his impulses and turns around to look at the woman in the red dress, Mouse's proud creation. Neo

Media Comparison: Tomb Raider and The Matrix

1134 words - 5 pages Media Essay Assignment aim: To compare the first scenes if the films 'Lara Croft tomb Raider' and 'The Matrix' In this essay, I aim to compare the first scenes of the films 'Lara Croft Tomb Raider' and 'The Matrix'.I want to show how the main female characters, 'Trinity' and 'Lara Croft', appear superior to any other character, although made to appear weak at first.In 'Tomb Raider', they employ a clever use of low angle shots, and eerie music to

The Mind and the World: Descartes Meditations

1194 words - 5 pages C. Santos Professor R. Boeker The Mind and the World Due: October 18, 2013 Descartes presents three skeptical arguments in his meditations which shows he has reason to doubt all of his sensory beliefs. Descartes ultimately aims to free himself from all bad beliefs. His quest for certainty is driven from his belief that our belief system is built on a foundation of basic beliefs, that are not justified, in turn, causing him to believe

Descartes and the Existence of God

1181 words - 5 pages Descartes and the Existence of God Once Descartes has realized that he can know with certainty that “I exist” is true, he continues to build on his foundation of truths. The truth about the nature of God, proof of God’s existence, and the nature of corporeal objects are considered, among others, after Descartes proves his existence. Descartes’ principal task in the Meditations was to devise a system that would bring him to the truth. He

Descartes on the Mind and Body

834 words - 4 pages A substance is a philosophical term that defines what a philosopher believes the world to be composed of. Descartes states that the world is composed of two substances: matter and mind. He states that he knows that matter and mind are distinct substances since he can distinctly think of each one separately and since matter is divisible while mind is not. These attempts at proving the distinctness of matter and mind from one another are both

The Rationalism of Descartes and Leibniz

2257 words - 9 pages The Rationalism of Descartes and Leibniz Although philosophy rarely alters its direction and mood with sudden swings, there are times when its new concerns and emphases clearly separate it from its immediate past. Such was the case with seventeenth-century Continental rationalism, whose founder was Rene Descartes and whose new program initiated what is called modern philosophy. In a sense, much of what the Continental rationalists set out

Descartes and the Existence of Physical Objects

673 words - 3 pages Descartes and the Existence of Physical Objects In his sixth meditation Descartes must return to the doubts he raised in his first one. Here he deals mainly with the mind-body problem and tries to prove whether material things exist with certainty. In this meditation he develops his dualist argument; by making a distinction between mind and body; although he also reveals that the are significantly related. He considers existence of the

Similar Essays

The Matrix And Descartes Essay

1378 words - 6 pages 1 The Matrix and Descartes APUS PHIL 101 Professor Cynthia Lindenmeyer Michelle Black October 19, 2012 2 The Matrix and Descartes The "collective hallucination" portrayed in the trilogy, 'The Matrix' by Larry and Andy Wachowski, explores an array of philosophical concepts. Particularly prevalent questions that are raised throughout the films include: "What is real?" and "How can I know (or arrive at) the truth?" This paper will focus on

Decartes And The Matrix Essay

1402 words - 6 pages Descartes and MatrixMatrix is an interesting movie because it examines very basic questions of philosophy. The existence of human being, the reality of this world we live and the questions of the reliability of human mind are examined during the movie. When examined deeply, it is found that the philosophy of Matrix has very common features with the philosophy of Descartes. The dream metaphor, the deception of people by a 'malignant demon', the

Baudrillard And The Matrix Essay

1287 words - 5 pages In 1999 Larry and Andy Wachowski wrote and directed an American science fiction action film called The Matrix. The movie depicted a future where many humans might perceive is real, is actually a simulated reality. The Wachowski brothers made many explicit references in their film based on the work of French sociologist Jean Baudrillard. In Jean Baudrillard’s essay entitled “Simulacra and Simulations” he mentions in his essay how society has

The Matrix And Technology Essay

1441 words - 6 pages unstoppable, wondrous and destructive. Both seem to predict the future of the world as it seen in the movie, "The Matrix." Latour's view of technology is that it comes from a wish to do good and improve life. He uses the example of a door to demonstrate the concept of dependance of machines. The door is the "machine" that people marveled at, when it was introduced, not knowing that it brought problems. Who would close it? Who would open it? Would