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Describe The Key Issues Involved In The Women's Liberation Movement, As Well As Discussing The Outcomes Of The Movement.

1364 words - 5 pages

Describe the key issues involved in the Women's Liberation Movement, as well as discussing the outcomes of the movement.The Women's Liberation Movement was officially established in Australia in nineteen seventy. The members fought for legal, social and economic equality. It was established for many different reasons including, the postwar rejection of women in the workforce, the lack of power the women had and the way they were treated by men. The American Women's Liberation was also established in the late 1960's, which gave inspiration to a minority of women in Australia. The main figures involved in the Women's Liberation Movement included Germaine Greer and Anne Summers. Germaine Greer was the author of The Female Eunuch, which was seen by many as marking the beginning of feminism and liberationism. Anne Summers was an author and a liberationist in the late 1960's. She wrote the book Damned Whores and God's Police, which changed the way many women saw themselves. Women began to realise that they did have the rights that men did. These leading liberationists have inspired other women to come forward and fight for women's rights and equality. The movement of women's liberation attracted various reactions, mainly of shock and disgust by the community and government. However, gradually over time, the harsh reactions to the liberation movement lessened from the community. Women's rights and equality is now accepted by a majority of the Australian population. There have been many outcomes of the Women's Liberation Movement, the most predominant being the social and economic advantages provided to the current generation.The Women's Liberation Movement was not established overnight. There were many build-ups following the second World War, which ended in 1945. During the war women were required to do all types of work while the men were away. Many of the women began to enjoy working in their jobs and were quite upset when the men returned to their positions, expecting the women to go back home and take care of the children and the domestic duties. There was the expectation that mothers and wives would stay at home while the men worked. The men imposed these expectations since the beginning of time (Dever, 1994: 38). The expectations women had upon them were extremely dull for some. Although many women enjoyed staying at home with the children, others could not bear to perform the everyday tasks of cleaning and minding the children. There was also the fact that women had no power socially or economically (Lake, 1999: 235). The man was in charge of the house and his wife and nothing was questioned. It was looked down upon by society for a female to get divorced or to disobey her husband. During the late nineteen sixties and early nineteen seventies, American women were also fighting for women's rights and equality (Summers, 1975: 416). All of these circumstances eventually led to a process of redefining the intellectual climate and the cultural norms...

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