Development Of Indigenious People Essay

1693 words - 7 pages

The question of whether or not indigenous people should be developed had never been popular in our society, not to say ignored. This is a very important subject that is not being taken seriously in a very long period of time. First, who are the indigenous people? It is estimated that there are more than 370 million indigenous people spread across 70 countries worldwide. Although the United Nation does not have a definition of indigenous people, but it has established an understanding of this on which can be briefly summarized indigenous peoples as having a set of specific rights based on their historical ties to a particular territory, and their cultural or historical distinctiveness from ...view middle of the document...

In Stephen Corry’s article, "Do indigenous people benefit from ‘development’?” he suggested development is in fact part of colonialism, which “set out to take away their self-suffiency, on their own territory, and lead them to glorious productivity on someone else’s”. He mentioned that people are forced to live new metal shelters because traditional housing has been made illegal. Furthermore, in Australia, Siberia and Botswana, aboriginal children are made to study in boarding school far away from home where they are taught to become part of the modern society while forgetting everything about their origin. As seen here In addition to this, Stephen Corry also stated, “Development isn’t about lifting people out of poverty, it’s about masking the takeover of their territories.”
This idea is further supported by the HRCA’s report which accused the Thai government of discrimination and violation human rights against the Nothern tribal population in order to maximize benefits from resources in the area. The HRCA reported that a large number of Thai believe these ethnic communities are responsible for deforestation, pollution, soil erosion, flooding, drug trafficking and Thailands national security problems. The mainstream media can and is introducing misconceptions about native indigenous people the rest of the population, thus the government’s actions will be supported by majority. Some nomadic tribes are only given temporary recognition, meaning that there forbidden to travel to a different province, which greatly affect their way of life. Another problem that the report have shown is that “all forest land is formally by the government” so villagers are often removed from the region so development or plantation can be established. After that, the tribal population has no involvement with managing the forest. According to the report, many of the hill tribe people have into change their name and learn Thai in order to earn Thai citizenship. Only then, they can own land for agriculture purposes. The younger children are also forced to “changes from tribal religions to Buddhism or Christianity” , as wells as learn with the Thai curriculum which give them the idea that tribal tradition is obsolete and should be left behind. All of the actions by the Thai government mentioned above have infringed the Universal Declaration of Human Right which stated that:
“Article 13
1) Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each State.
2) Everyone has the right to leave any country including his own, and to return to his country.
Article 15
1) Everyone has the right to a nationality
2) No-One shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality.
Article 17
1) Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others.
2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property”
The first article is available on the online version of The Guardian, a British newspaper by Stephen Corry, a British...

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