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Developmental Changes In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1241 words - 5 pages

Developmental Changes in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

 
   In the novel "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain, the

protagonist, Huck, undergoes a series of developmental changes in his character.

He is often torn between the ideas of society and those of his friends.  This

can all be very confusing for a boy who is about 14 years old.  Huck also has a

drunken pap who doesn't care at all for him.  Huck is then forced to live with

Widow Douglas and Miss Watson.  Throughout the story we see Huck represent the

morals of the innocent prevailing over those of society.  In his "adventures,"

he learns the meaning of true friendship and what's really important in life.

 

     In the story, Huck makes the decision to escape from his "family."  This is

a decision that goes against the morals of Huck's society, church and state.

Children aren't supposed to run away from their parents.  Also, his decision to

help Jim escape goes against the same morals.  In his "adventurous" escape down

the Mississippi, he begins to feel truly free.  This is a feeling that is

contrasted acutely of society's "oppression" of freedom, basically when he is on

land.  In Jim's and Huck's escape, they are able to build their trust and

friendship for each other.  However, at the same time he must leave behind

societies ways...  getting "sivilized, money, and "family."

 

     Along Jim's and Huck's "adventure," they have many conversations along the

way.  These conversations consist about their freedom, money, and superstition.

In the story, they both have their own opinions about various things, like

Solomon.

 

          "'Well, but he was the wisest man, anyway; because the widow she told

     me so, her own self."

          "I doan' k'yer what de widder say, he warn't no wise man nuther.  He

     has some er de dad-fetchedes' ways I ever see.  Does you know 'bout dat

chile

     dat he 'uz gwyne to chop in two?"

          "Yes, the widow told me all about it."

          "Well, den!  Warn' dat de beatenes' notion in de worl'?  You jus' take

 

     en look at it a minute.  Dah's de stump, dah-dat's one er de women!  heah's

             you-dat's de yuther one; I's Sollermun; en dish yer dollar bill's

de chile.  Bofe              un you claims it.  What does I do?  Does I shin

aroun' mongs' de neighbors en fine out which un you de bill do b'long to, en

han' it over to de right one, all safe               en soun, de way dat anybody

dat had any gumption would?  No; I take en whack              de bill in two, en

give half it to you, en de yuther to de yuther women.  Dat's de             way

Sollermum was gwyne to do wid de chile.  Now I want to ast you; what's de use er

dat half a billl?-can't buy noth'n wid it.  En what use is a half a chile?  I

wouldn' give a...

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