Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion Essay

1342 words - 5 pages

Philo indicates in the first premise of his first argument of Part X, that the only way society was able to implement religion and a supreme Deity that would also build longevity, needed some sort of image of association. Philo is classified as a skeptic, he interjects that the idea of there being a God has no proof of existence through the sentiments of man that claim no real testimony of divine intervention of any higher intellect without using some sort of system. There is no order of cohesion that determines what should give sufficient enough reason for religion; but to implement such ideologies’ into existence would require some type of human characteristics (anthropomorphism). Philo is trying to prove that creating a source for inspirational for all to believe without question of a God that seems to have human characteristics should be considered blasphemy. In my eyes humans are more acceptable to beliefs of others before questioning possibilities. What respect doe God's grace and mercy actually resemble the grace and mercy of humans? If God created evil and good, then Philo asks if God is impotent, or malevolent, or both? It is possible to see the things on this planet and make observations of order which Cleanthes compares vegetation and animals are more like machinery. Yet machines do not have the capability to feel happiness or sorrow to preserve them from propagation of life. Philo then questions how are people to believe in the understanding of attributes from a perfect God that is incomprehensible.

Demea thinks that all man should understand the truth of religion and should not enter into a higher consciousness or reasoning of a Deity, this would be considered blasphemy. He constantly questions how one should view the religion and the concepts of the ills of life, but he values the conversation and topic concerning human misery with an atheist. In Demea’s response to Philo's argument, he uses the comparison of the world to universe and life’s moments to eternity. That the evil phenomena are proven in many religions and possible future endeavors. Even though mans’ eyes are open to the views of general laws as a whole. He thinks that these laws are connected with adoration and benevolence of God's Devin Spirit.

Cleanthes immediately says No to all such claims by calling them superstition, regardless of fact, views, and undiscovered information. He questions how is it possible for anyone to know this type of information, and how can one prove a hypothesis be proven beyond what is already known? The only way to prove such understanding would be from senseless thinking. Cleanthes also thinks it is not possible for anyone to have enough understanding of mentality to go beyond Devine Benevolence. The only way to support this type of thinking, one would have to reject all misery and wickedness of man. Then Cleanthes criticizes Philo's presentation by saying that it is exaggerated. That the words Philo uses to explain his theories to...

Find Another Essay On Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion

Teleological Argument for the Existence of God

2740 words - 11 pages This paper will examine the argument put forward by William Paley in 1802, in his Natural Theology. Paley offers an argument from design that purports to show a clear and distinct reason why one should hold a belief in God, due to the inherent features of the world. It is attempted in this paper to firstly: show that the argument should be rejected on the grounds of lacking a rationally flowing set of premises and conclusions; and secondly:...

Homosexuality, Nature or Nurture? Essay

1652 words - 7 pages Is homosexuality a result of a deviation in someone's biological make-up, or is it due to the factors of environment while they are growing up? In this essay, I argue that homosexuality is indeed a inborn property rather than the way a child is brought up. To back up my argument I will use religious support, scientific proof and insight from someone who has been around a gay her whole life. This is a topic that has gone through much debate, a...

Notes on Enlightenment Thinkers

746 words - 3 pages The Enlightenment Thinkers and Their Major IdeasPhilosopherDatesImportant WorksMajor ideasThomas Hobbes1588-1679Leviathan“People need a powerful ruler like a sea monster”-All humans are naturally selfish and wicked.-Without government and order, people will fight.-You need a strong ruler, and in return you gain law and order-In favor of Absolute Monarchy because they impose order and demand obedienceJohn Locke1632-1704Essay Concerning...

Plato

3598 words - 14 pages Plato Biography Plato was born in Athens of an aristocratic family. He recounts in the Seventh Letter, which, if genuine, is part of his autobiography, that the spectacle of the politics of his day brought him to the conclusion that only philosophers could be fit to rule. After the death of Socrates in 399, he travelled extensively. During this period he made his first trip to Sicily, with whose internal politics he became much entangled....

The Reasons Why Some Thinkers Rejected the Cosmological Argument

862 words - 3 pages The Reasons Why Some Thinkers Rejected the Cosmological Argument Aquinas’s argument was as follows: If the universe was infinite, it would have an infinite number of days. The end of an infinite series of days can never be reached, so today would never arrive. However, today has arrived, so the past cannot be infinite. Time began when the universe began, which was an event. Events are caused; therefore there must have...

Plato to Darwin to DNA – A Brief History

974 words - 4 pages BIO 11 Lab Queens College This book has been molded to be a breakdown of how various fields in science have progressed over centuries as mankind has advanced. The book starts off introducing the idea that the telling of natural history has changed numerous times as humans have evolved. We also learn to agree that our knowledge has been shaped by the tools available and the perceptions of its users. In the earliest stages of life, Muehlbauer...

The Path to the Future: Science or Religion?

1242 words - 5 pages Religion is a concept that has been around us ever since we first became self-aware. Whenever the first human realized that there were: earthquakes, heavy winds, volcanoes, and tornadoes, humans immediately tried to find an explanation for it and at the end they decided that only a god could do such things. This was the creation of religion. Throughout the ages, humans developed different beliefs and explanations for seemingly inexplicable things...

Plato and The Renaissance

1843 words - 7 pages Plato (428-347 B.C.E.) is considered to be one of the greatest philosophers the world has ever known. Though concerned with specific problems of his own era, Plato's ideas transcend all time. Throughout the ages his works have been translated into many languages and studied by great thinkers of every region of the world. A revival of Platonic thought occurred during the Renaissance. Though Plato's ideas have survived in their original forms,...

Conscience Created versus Innate

2097 words - 8 pages Conscience Created versus Innate To what extent do you think you are dictated by your surroundings and your up-bringing? Do you claim your opinions to be your own? Do you trust your logic and your conscience? These are questions that are seldom asked by ourselves or by others. In fact, these kinds of questions could almost be considered taboo. It seems to be generally accepted that one can trust oneself, one’s authority, and one’s...

An Analytical Approach to Truth and Religion

6399 words - 26 pages An Analytical Approach to Truth and Religion ABSTRACT: I discuss some of the problems of the application of the notion of truth to religion. After introductory remarks on the problem called truth and religion to show the peculiarity and the actuality of the problem discussed, I examine the different meanings of the notions of truth and religion, in order to formulate some comments on the different concepts of the truth of religion. I name...

The Problem of Evil in Hume's Dialouges on Natural Religion and "Candide"

1398 words - 6 pages Hume, Voltaire and the Problem of EvilThe presence of evil and suffering in the world has raised questions in the philosophy of religion for centuries. The traditional understanding, held by Christians since it was fully developed by Augustine, is that of original sin. The belief is that man is born evil, as a result of the transgression of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. At the moment of sin evil entered the world, and it is now a...

Similar Essays

An Analysis Of Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion

4432 words - 18 pages An Analysis of Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion ABSTRACT: Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (1779) may be read in the way Cleanthes (and Philo as well) reads Nature, as analogous to human artifice and contrivance. The Dialogues and Nature then are both texts, with an intelligent author or Author, and analogies may be started from these five facts of Hume's text: the independence of Hume's characters; the...

David Hume And Karl Marx’s Critiques Of Religion

1287 words - 5 pages Where does religion come from? Many have tried to answer this question, only leaving us with more questions than answers. This essay will focus on two philosophers David Hume and Karl Marx both has strong critiques on the existence of God. Both going against the design argument, the design argument is the argument for the existence of God or single creator; however, with Hume’s empiricist and Marx's atheist they both attack the design argument in...

Paley Vs. Hume This Is A Inductive Argument About The Origin And Nature Of God, Religion, And The Universe

1025 words - 4 pages Paley vs. HumeI read William Paley's, "The Argument from Design", and David Hume's, "Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion." What I established after reading these two arguments is that it is extraordinarily difficult to come to any conclusion about the origin of the universe and the world. Both are inductive arguments about the origin and nature of God, religion, and the universe; things that can never be proven true and absolute.In Paley's...

God Creator Or God As Creation Is A Very Controversial Topic

1174 words - 5 pages I don't have to introduce my topic because my title says more than I could ever say. God creator or God as creation is a very controversial topic. Personally I think that God created everything and that the other aspect seems a little off the wall. But as I research these topics I will be open minded to the other possibilities.I am going to start with my research concerning the proof of God being the creator. Obviously there is the most well...