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Different Perspectives Of Cuban Revolution Essay

2449 words - 10 pages

Different Perspectives of Cuban Revolution

Introduction:

The measures taken by Castro and explicitly stated by him at his trial in 1954, from the very beginning of his anti-Batista movement illustrate his initial desires to reform Cuba and ultimately increase its standard of living. Different understandings can be perceived by reading various books and documents that focus on the political changes shaping Cuba’s modern-day society. Each illustrates different aspects of the insurrection while simultaneously giving the reader an accurate depiction of the historical occurrences. Authors Perez-Stable and Patterson focus on the turbulent circumstances that lead Cuba through the various leaders, each with his own agenda trying to better the lives of Cuban citizens. In the speech given by Castro at his own trial entitled, "History Will Absolve Me", Castro outlines the ideologies and beliefs that justify his reasons for initiating his revolutionary movement against Fulgencio Batista. The document of the "Program Manifesto of the 26th of July Movement", gives a first-hand understanding of what Castro and his group of supporters were going to fight to achieve through a Revolution. Finally, one can understand the tribulations that these men overcame when reading through Guevara’s perspective found in his chapter titled, "One Year of Armed Struggle". By understanding how Castro’s movement began and how it evolved, one can note the key components of the changes and reforms being demanded of the Cuban government during the 1950’s.

Perez-Stable

Within the first two chapters of author Perez-Stable’s book, The Cuban Revolution: Origins, Course and Legacy, he focuses much on economic aspects of Cuba’s dependence on the United States and how this affected the political structure of Cuba’s "monoculture" economy. He dedicates the first chapter to highlighting the economic structure of Cuba and how it correlates to its relationship to the United States. Because of Cuba’s reliance on the export of sugar, Cubans were severely limited in terms of diversifying its economy and raising its standard of living. According to Perez-Stable,

"Without diversification, jobs would not be createdand living standards raised…Moving Cuba from classic dependence on sugar to a new form of dependent capitalism, however, required a realignment of domestic actors, a new role for the state, and a restructuring of Cuba-U.S. relations."

These issues appear as reoccurring themes that build the platforms for many of the reforms sought by Castro himself. This is because these issues address the focal points of concern for most Cuban citizens.

The second chapter in Perez-Stable’s book deals more with the political transitions that shaped Cuba’s societal structure during the turbulent early 1900’s. Corruption and problems with the governmental structure coincided with the economic crises. Many Cubans fostered anti-American sentiments and regarded the...

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