This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Different Views Of Huck Finn By Mark Twain

955 words - 4 pages

In Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Huck and his society have a completely different set of norms and morals. Throughout the book this is exemplified in many choices that Huck has to make that go against his views and the views of society.
In the beginning of the book Huck is living with a widow who is trying to make Huck “sivilized” (Twain 41) and Huck is describing how he hates being civilized because it is not what he is used to he is used to being in the woods with his dad and not having any rules and caring about what society thinks. So Huck’s sanity and happiness is being sacrificed for the good of society. This is being done so that Huck can be a productive member of ...view middle of the document...

In this perfect society you must go to school, sit up straight, and go to Sunday school. During his time being “sivilized” (Twain 41) Huck makes some money and his dad finds out and shows up at his house. This leads Huck to be kidnapped by his father. During this time in the woods Huck realizes how much being civilized sucks and throws all of the morals and proper behavior out the door. Huck says "It was pretty good times up in the woods there, take it all around" (Twain 40) this exemplifies the fact that Huck loves the freedom of the outdoors and the woods. But Huck soon realizes that his dad is not what he used to be. His dad starts locking him in the cabin when he goes out so he can’t leave the cabin. His dad just wants the $6000.00 that Huck had but he already gave his money to the Judge. During the times that Huck’s dad is out he gets drunk and put in jail and causes mayhem in the town.
This leads Huck to escape from his father’s cabin and he finds a raft that he floats down the Mississippi with. He ends up back at the Miss Watson’s house. But he isn’t there to become civilized he is there to help the Miss Watson’s slave escape. This goes against Huck’s views and society’s views. This is shown in this quote "call me a low down ablitionist and despise me for keeping mum"(Twain 67). Society will view his as an abolitionist which is not a good thing to be called in the south during this time period. Helping a slave escape is crime because slaves were viewed...

Find Another Essay On Different Views of Huck Finn by Mark Twain

Evolving Huck in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

1223 words - 5 pages , similar to Huck Finn. In the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is a story about a 13 year old boy who heads out on a journey through the Mississippi River with a black runaway slave, Jim. Through the trials they went through during the adventure, it opened up a new sense of understanding for the world. Twain manipulates Huck to be an evolving character in the novel supported by his changes in maturity and morals. Huck Finn

Comparison of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

687 words - 3 pages Comparison of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn were both characters created by Mark Twain. Tom Sawyer is the main character in the book The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn is the main character in the book The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer were alike in many ways but they were also very different. One way in which

Huck Finn (by Twain) Thesis

1312 words - 5 pages Many would say that Huck Finn is a very troubled young boy. He was brought up by hisfather deep in the woods just off the Mississippi River. His father strongly disliked societytherefore he lived as far as possible from it. Huck's dad brought Huck up the hard way withouta mother and instilled many of his beliefs into Huck. His dad lied constantly and was alwaysdrunk, his favorite saying was 'I'm not stealing it I'm just borrowing it'. Huck's dad

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

821 words - 3 pages In Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, Huck, the main character, attempts to establish his identity. Huck explores many identities that appeal to him throughout the story, such as a religious and "sivilized" life with the Widow Douglas, a violent and irrational life with the Grangerfords, and a dishonest and imposturous life with the Duke and King. However, by assimilating to others, Huck essentially neglects his true morals, beliefs

Comparison of "Catcher In The Rye" by Salinger And "The Adventures of Huck Finn" by Mark Twain

1361 words - 5 pages The forthcoming of American literature proposes two distinct Realistic novels portraying characters which are tested with a plethora of adventures. In this essay, two great American novels are compared: The Adventures of Huck Finn by Mark Twain and The Catcher In The Rye by J.D. Salinger. The Adventures of Huck Finn is a novel based on the adventures of a boy named Huck Finn, who along with a slave, Jim, make their way along the Mississippi

Huckelberry Finn by Mark Twain

1166 words - 5 pages Everywhere around the world there are people being hateful towards one another. Everyday there are new crimes to be reported on the news of people dying or of laws being broken. As time goes by in present day life and in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, the bitter ways of people are demonstrated time and time again. People have been evil to one another for ages in many different ways. There are many murders, abuses, and frauds

Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

2802 words - 11 pages . This name signifies the borderline between acceptable and not acceptable- as shown in his writing. Twain had three punctilious messages in his novel. Mark Twain wrote Huck Finn to express his disillusionment of society through the eyes of a young farm boy who realized that senseless violence, racism, and slavery all expressed how cruel and corrupt people could be. Samuel Clemens grew up in Hannibal, Missouri. There, he experienced an

Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

659 words - 3 pages Twain is trying to get across.Finally, I'm against the censorship of Huckleberry Finn because the censors didn't give the novel a chance. Several students said that they were offended at first, but got over it once they got more into the book. You have to look at this novel as a whole, not by passages or words. The people who criticize Huckleberry Finn don't look at all the positive aspects of it. The critics see the word nigger and quickly say

Troublesome To Do Right, discusses the morality of Huck in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain

1365 words - 5 pages Troublesome To Do RightWith his novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain was able to poke, prod, and cast doubt on the society he grew up in. But he did it subtly, through the eyes of a child. When Huck questions something, it is Twain's unobtrusive way of pointing out the moral flaws of his society. And more specifically, "The dynamic theme throughout [The Adventures of] Huckleberry Finn is the unresolved dialectic between the moral

Huck Finn: Should It Be Taught In American Literature Mark Twain, The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1331 words - 6 pages Huck Finn: Should it be taught in American Literature?Throughout the years, few books have been as highly debated and criticized as Mark Twain's 1885 novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The book's controversies are still heavily debated today. Many schools have gone as far as to ban this book from high school reading lists, despite its strong display of realism. However, this novel is a historical piece of literature and should not be

Religion’s Struggle Against Huck in the Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

1189 words - 5 pages : Sterling, 2006. Print. Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. New York: Sterling, 2006. Print. Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. New York: Sterling, 2006. Print. Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. New York: Sterling, 2006. Print. Jegrišnik, Borut. “Society’s Views on Religion.” eHow, American Media, n.d. Web. 1 April 2014. Yates, Norris W. “The Counter-Conversion of Huck Finn.” American Literature 32 (1960): 1-10.

Similar Essays

Racism In Huck Finn By Mark Twain

663 words - 3 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, is an excellent example of racism in literature, because it uses language describing African Americans which goes beyond satire. It treats them as objects and perpetuates stereotypes. It does not expose and deal with racism, as many advocates of its reading claim, but encourages an attitude of superiority that is unnecessary and intolerable. In order to rid ourselves from this racism, African

"Huckleberry Finn" By Mark Twain: Racism In Huck Finn

979 words - 4 pages the son of the infant duke that was ignored to take over a position. Not to be outdone, the second man (the king) makes up a story that he was actually the rightful King of France. Mark Twain uses Huck Finn to show what he thinks of these two men. "It didn't take me to long to make up my mind that these liars warn't no kings nor dukes at all, but just low-down humbugs and frauds."(Pg.125) These men are putting up a false front just like society

The Learning Experience Of Huck Funn In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

2162 words - 9 pages Mark Twain’s novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is a story of a boy, Huck Finn, who runs away from home and travels down the Mississippi River with a “runaway nigger” named Jim. Huck’s father, Pap, is a drunken low life who doesn’t seem to care for his son. He comes from a poor, troubled family and isn’t very educated which is something he seems to embrace. “Huck Finn runs away not only from an abusive father but also from his good

The Use Of An Offensive Word In The Adventures Of Huck Finn By Mark Twain

760 words - 4 pages The Adventures of Huck Finn is a very controversial book which brings much debate on whether it should be taught to children in America. The main reason for this debate is because the offensive word ‘nigger’ is used commonly throughout. The book is a classic and is seen to some people as such a great book that we should overlook the offensive word to understand the real lessons Mark Twain wanted to get across. One solution to this ongoing debate