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Discovering The Brain Of Synesthesia Essay

1908 words - 8 pages

After they received doctorates in neurology and became curious about synesthesia, Dr. Richard Cytowic and Dr. David Eagleman converged their research, thoughts, and ideas into one book; “Wednesday is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia.” Synesthesia refers to the ability to experience different senses together. For example, words can be tasted, or colors can be heard. Dr. Richard Cytowic, a synesthete (one who experiences synesthesia) himself, received an M.D. in neurology from Duke. Dr. Cytowic is now a Professor of neurology at George Washington University and has written multiple books, some on the topic synesthesia. Being a synesthete, Dr. Cytowic is very effective in presenting synesthesia in this book. The other author of this book, Dr. David Eagleman, also received a Ph.D. in neurology at Baylor College of Medicine and went on to direct the neuroscience laboratory at Baylor among many other educational and scientific endeavors. Both of these doctors are well-studied and experienced in their studies of neurology and the mind. That being said, they have the know-how and credentials to write this book.
Synesthesia – the topic these doctors discuss - is not a well-known or well-studied subject, so these doctors are two of the few pioneers in the resurgence of this topic. The idea of synesthesia has been around since Greek philosophers pondered the idea of it, but it was not until the 1800’s that it became a specified scientific field of study. Between the 1930’s and 1980’s synesthesia was thrown on the backburner as a new age of behaviorism became prevalent in the field of psychology. However, synesthesia made a comeback during the ‘90’s and has continued to become more well-known among the general public (not just scientists and psychologists), much thanks to the internet. “Wednesday is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia” was written in 2009 is very recent but seeing how many fields of the sciences are constantly changing some of the information may have changed in the past five years. Because of the novelty of this subject, these two doctors, being experts in their field inquired about synesthesia and decided to broaden what the scientific world knows about synesthesia. As these doctors try to explain their findings, they seem to know what they are talking about. After reading this book, I would recommend it to anyone wanting a new interesting topic in psychology to research.
Drs. Cytowic and Eagleman show their knowledge and intelligence of not just synesthesia specifically, but of the field of psychology throughout the entirety of this book. The diction and vocabulary chosen is proof of their in-depth study of synesthesia. Some words could be explained more for those reading that psychology is not exactly their forte. On the flip side, the authors do not use only words that children can understand. The doctors put substance and depth into their writing making the reader work a little to read and...

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