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Discrimination In The Bluest Eye By Toni Morrison

1188 words - 5 pages

In Toni Morrison’s novel, “The Bluest Eye,” a character named Pecola Breedlove had always been wishing to have the bluest eyes, since it was considered as pretty in the novel’s world. Also, a lighter skin African American, Maureen Peal, bullied Pecola, who has darker skin, because Maureen thinks that she is cute, while she thinks Pecola is ugly. Similarly, Pecola always thought that she was ugly, because she does not have blue eyes. On the other hand, Maureen Peal came from a wealthier family and that made her think highly of herself. Although Pecola didn't come from a wealthy family but rather a lower class family and she went through hard times throughout her life. Morrison’s novel shows ...view middle of the document...

This shows that she is able to stand up for her rights. Therefore, now people are able to stand up for themselves more freely unlike in the novel, where they get teased and all they can do is not do anything.
Furthermore, as time went by, people learned to appreciate their own ethnicity and culture. They start to accept who they are and accept each other instead of wanting to become someone that they aren't. For instance, a friend of mine who was mixed Asian and Hispanic used to think of herself as ugly, because most of her friends who are full American always get compliments from people, while she never got a single compliment. She was always pessimistic about herself because of her ethnicity and culture is different from the people in her school. However, one day, she asked her friends if they think she is ugly, they told her that she is perfect the way she is, because she is unique and there is only one of her in this world. After that, she felt better and started to believe in herself more. On top of that, she was proud of her ethnicity because that made her unique in her school. This shows that everyone needs to be more optimistic about themselves; and, once they are, they will accept who they are rather than wanting to be like someone else. Although, Pecola could not do that. She thought of herself as ugly, because everyone around her think she is ugly. So, she wished to have blue eyes, because she believes that it will make her prettier. Also, with blue eyes, Pecola can live a better life, because everyone will treat her better. Thus, Pecola went to a man named Soaphead Church and asked him to help her get blue eyes. He made her believed that she finally have the bluest eye that she’s been yearning for. In the end, Pecola still did not learn to appreciate and accept her old self. Therefore, things from the novel’s world was different from today’s world; because in today’s world, most people are starting to be more proud of who they are rather than trying to be something else.
Everything is slowly changing as time passes by. There is less racism and child molestation in this world than in the novel’s world. Most children are being raised with proper care and love rather than being neglected or being mistreated by their parents. Nowadays, there...

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