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Discuss The Different Relationships Between Man And Nature In Cormac Mc Carthy’s ‘All The Pretty Horses’ And In A Selection On Poems By William Wor

1057 words - 5 pages

In ‘All the Pretty Horses’ Luis states ‘among men there was no such communion as among horses and the notion that men can be understood at all was probably an illusion’, by this he means the relationship man has with nature is totally unique, it is sacred; the relationship between men is a misapprehension. In some respects the reader may agree with the statement because it is true, man’s relationship with animals and nature is fairly simple compared to man’s relationship amongst each other which is far more complex due to conflict of opinion and other complications. John Grady Cole’s relationship with Alejandra faced much turmoil and complication, one of the biggest issues they faced was the ...view middle of the document...

Victor’s creation has a negative effect on nature, rather than working with nature it opposes it. Mary Shelly’s message to the reader could be to never try to control or harness nature, the result will always be destructive and unnatural. On the other hand Victor Frankenstein, regardless of the effort and support of his friends it is nature which provides him with the true sustenance to allow him to hold on to the miniscule amount of sanity he has left.

In ‘All the Pretty Horses’ we see how man misuses and abuses nature when we treat it like it serves us, as if man has the ability to control nature. Man makes rules and regulations on land and nature, where nature can easily retaliate with disastrous repercussions, that is why it is vital for man to strike a balance with nature to minimalize the impact man has on nature and vice versa. Cormac McCarthy explores the spontaneity and uncontrollable qualities of nature, ‘when it rained all the following week and cleared… it rained again… beat down without mercy… over the highway bridge… the roads were close.’ Even though nature is the reason the road is closed, man is reliant upon nature irrigate the lands and water the crops, to a certain extent nature acts as a mercy, even though at a first glance it may not seem so. However it is clear nature is absolutely vital for the survival and existence of man as it provides every possible thing man needs. Cormac McCarthy also describes the rain ‘As if the rain were electric, had grounded circuits that the electric might be’ describing the rain as electric may be because electric is fast and energetic, it can also be due to the fact many people rely upon electric, hence implicitly describing man’s dependency on nature.

On a whole, the relationship between man and nature has been shown to be very important, the significance and unity of this relationship has been illuminated by Cormac McCarthy and William Wordsworth, whilst also being emphasized by Mary Shelly. However, all three literary figures represent the importance and significance of...

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