Discussion Of The Old Testament Essay

1665 words - 7 pages

There are many different forms of covenants in the Old testament that the people of God agree to. The first one being looked at is between God and Abraham. God promised Abraham a great nation and God said he would bless Abraham (Gen 2:2). God also promised him the Promise Land (Gen 15:18) and said he would be the father of many nations (Gen 17:4). All God asked of him was devotion from him and his people and to have circumcision be the sign from the people (Gen 17:11). The promises of the covenant directly impact Abraham, but they also impacted the people who would follow. God would also use these vows in other covenants because they had historic meaning. The Mosaic covenant has several ...view middle of the document...

The previous covenants were made and started when God talked to Abraham, Moses and King David; but when God talks to Jeremiah, he talks of a future covenant. In Jeremiah 31 God talks about the broken covenants, even though God was faithful on his end. He tells Jeremiah that he will put his law in the hearts of the followers and he will write on their hearts (Jer 31:33). This is another difference because God is no longer relying on the strength of men to fulfill the covenant, he is giving his people the tools.

The Deuteronomic writings refer to several books in the bible that parallel the book of Deuteronomy in presentation and principles. The books that are said to be written by the Deuteronomists are Joshua, Judges, 1 and 2 Samuel and kings, as well as deuteronomy. These books cover the conquest of Canaan to the Babylonian exile. These books were heavily influenced by the exile and the Mosaic laws. These books are believed to be recorded by several authors. The role of the Deuteronomists was a very strict and important part of the Hebrew faith because it holds the statutes and rules the people are meant to live by (Deuteronomy 12:1) and it also holds their collection of history. A huge theme in these texts is the devotion to God through the various laws and remembrance of him throughout their history. The books establish, using historic events, that following God's word will lead to unity, military victory and economic wealth. This theme stems from the history of the people and knowing God was with them in their times of victory because the people and their leaders feared God and followed his word. An addition to this theme is the fall and division of nations and natural disasters, the acts of God, when the people were disobedient. The authors always supported their themes using historical events and they tried to direct the readers back toward God and adhering to his words. The deuteronomic books begin with deuteronomy which contains the laws that are the expansion of the Ten Commandments. The deuteronomic books continue with the recording of the people of Israel's history, which include the implementation of an earthly kingship. The also contain the actions of the prophets of God. There is the presence of the religious and spiritual meaning, but their main purpose is to present the history. It also reads like the authors are trying to warn the future generations of Israel by cataloging the short comings. They books also provide positive reinforcement to the people by describing God’s love and blessing to the people who both fear and love him.

Before the people of Israel and Judah had an earthly king, they followed the words of God through people chosen by God. God used Judges and prophets as mediators between him and his people. After the reign of of the Judge Samuel, the people were guided by his sons. The people called for a king after the sons of Samuel become corrupted by bribes (1 Sam 8:4-5). Samuel talked to God and is told to...

Find Another Essay On Discussion of the old testament

Portrayals Of Women In The Old Testament

2333 words - 9 pages Portrayals of Women in the Old Testament: The Story of Esther The story of Esther takes place in the days of A-has-u-e'rus which reigned from India to Ethiopia, over a hundred and twenty-seven provinces. In these days A-has-u-e'rus sat on the throne of his kingdom in the palace of Shu'shan. In the third year of his reign he had a feast for all of his princes and his servants. During this feast, he "shewed the riches of his glorious

The Old Testament Law Essay

1268 words - 5 pages Introduction The Old Testament law is seen as irrelevant by most modern Christians today. Christians are now under the blood of Jesus Christ, which is said to abrogate the Law. Galatians 6:2 says, “Bear one another's burdens, and thereby fulfill the law of Christ” (NASB). The law of Christ is to love God and your neighbor as yourself (Matthew 22:36-40). This does not mean, however, that the Old Testament Law does not apply to Christians today

The Old Testament

892 words - 4 pages Christian theologians have taken part in biblical scholarship for centuries on the qualities of the Old Testament that have changed western civilization forever. Walter Brueggemann is no exception to the enormous contributions theologians have made to these discussions in his respected work, The Prophetic Imagination. Here, Brueggemann proposes the social actions of the prophets Moses, Isaiah, Ecclesiastes, and Jeremiah as revolutionary insofar

The Old Testament

2092 words - 8 pages The Old Testament is a compilation, and like every compilation it has a wide variety of contributors who, in turn, have their individual influence upon the final work. It is no surprise, then, that there exist certain parallels between the Enuma Elish, the cosmogony of the Babylonians, and the Book of Genesis, the first part of the Pentateuch section of the Bible. In fact, arguments may be made that other Near Eastern texts, particularly

The Old Testament: Foreshadowing the New Testament

1212 words - 5 pages Examples of Redemption One of the most pronounced examples of redemption in the Old Testament is the Lord’s enabling Moses to redeem the Israelites out of bondage in the land of Egypt. During the end time of their inhabitation in the land of Egypt, the Israelite nation experienced very cruel hardships and persecution. God in His graciousness, love, and mercy delivered them out of this persecution. In addition, the Lord set apart the nation of

The Old Testament: Foreshadowing the New Testament

2485 words - 10 pages In the days of Christ’s life on this earth, believers did not have access to the Bible in its entirety as we know and are familiar with today. Believers in this ancient time period only had access to the Old Testament. However, through their access to the Old Testament, believers were provided a foundation for New Testament times. This foundation provided New Testament believers with the Lord’s established principles of right and wrong they were

History of the Old Testament of the Bible

3089 words - 12 pages Studying the Old Testament is not as straightforward as some may think. Being able to recall stories of the Bible does not necessarily mean you have a thorough grasp on the history of Israel and the surrounding nations. Some people read and discuss the Bible without a solid understanding of the history and social issues that were going on at the time. Being able to relate to the stories in the Bible and struggle with some of the same

The Old Testament and The Code of Hammurabi

832 words - 3 pages The Old Testament and The Code of Hammurabi To write an essay on the differences of the two texts given in Oliver Johnson's book presents quite a challenge since both texts are so different and yet have some over-all similarities. Where to start, and how to present these differences are two perplexing questions. I will, however, present in the following manner: I will describe the characteristics of the Old Testament, then contrast the Old

The Identities of Joseph and Esther from the Old Testament

1443 words - 6 pages The Identities of Joseph and Esther from the Old Testament The Bible is full of common themes, yet there one prominent underlying thread that runs constant throughout is that in order to be influential, people are placed in positions where they are able to assimilate to the common culture, but are still set apart from other ordinary people. Assimilation is defined as the process where a group adopts the customs of the prevailing culture

Essay about the Old Testament

2366 words - 9 pages Essay about the Hebrew Scriptures Introduction: The study of the scriptures conforming the Old Testament, is a good start not only for those who believe, but also for non-believers looking forward to go further in the study of the sacred and man's relationship with the spiritual realm. The Old Testament (also known as the Hebrew Scriptures) is a true literary jewel whose influence reflects in the work of many prominent authors from

Salvation in the Old Testament

998 words - 4 pages always involves some sort of end to the world. Nevertheless, there is an astounding amount of room for variation within apocalyptic texts. The Old Testament apocalyptic prophets Joel, Isaiah, and Ezekiel all offer different answers to the questions surrounding salvation at the end of the world, with their answers reflecting different worldviews and even different perceptions of the same God. The prophet Joel believed that everyone would have

Similar Essays

Overview Of The Old Testament Essay

997 words - 4 pages Old Testament PAGE 1 Overview of the Old TestamentJoseph MaczkoGrand Canyon UniversityThe Old Testament consists of 39 books of history from Genesis to Malachi. Beginning with Genesis all though undated marks the start of creation when God created Adam and Eve, they were without sin. However, they became sinful when they disobeyed God and ate some fruit from the tree. Through Adam and Eve, we learn about the destructive power of sin and its

The History Of The Old Testament Chronologically

1894 words - 8 pages Old Testament is a Christian name for the Hebrew Bible, which serves as the first division of the Christian Bible. The designations "Old" and "New" seem to have been adopted after c.A.D.; 200 to distinguish the books of the Mosaic covenant and those of the "new" covenant in Christ. New Testament writers, however, simply call the Old Testament the "Scriptures."The Books of the Old TestamentAmong contemporary Christians, the Roman Catholic Church

Analysis Of The Fictional Work "Old Testament"

625 words - 3 pages The Bible is the most influential book ever written. The Bible consists of two main divisions, the New and the Old Testaments. If the main idea of The Bible were to be described in two words, those would be loyalty and forgiveness. Throughout the Old Testament are people larger than life whose moral characters are straight and upright. These men helped shape our values, morals, religion, and decisions.In the book of Genesis is the story of

Old Testament: The Book Of Ruth

3481 words - 14 pages Introduction The book of Ruth is one of the most beloved books in the Old Testament. The themes contained in Ruth include, but are not limited to the following: (1) the lineage of David is traced back to Boaz and Ruth (Ruth 4:17), (2) the tender love story between Ruth and Boaz, and (3) the faithfulness of Ruth towards Naomi (Ruth 1:13-18). As endearing as these themes and other might be, the primary theme in the book of Ruth is expressed in