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Disney Inc. Operational Planning Essay

2205 words - 9 pages

Disney Inc. Operational Planning

Strengths and Weaknesses

There are four different types of planning within and organization,
strategic, tactical, operational, and contingency. Each will have an
impact on each other and how they are carried out. Disney’s
operational planning consists of how things are run on a day-to-day
basis within a year helping to reach the company’s strategic planning
goals.

“Operational planning identifies the specific procedures and processes
required at lower levels of the organization.” (Scott, 2004 ) Within
Disney this would be the processes for day-to-day operations within
the Theme parks, the stores, on the e-commerce site etc.

Some of the strengths Disney’s operational planning has would be their
customer focus. Take Disney’s theme parks were there hundreds of
employees working on daily basis trying to accomplish one thing, which
is to make the customer happy. Disney knows that if they don’t make
the customer happy, people will not return. Comparing the size of
Disney’s theme parks to that of a shopping store this can be a little
harder to accomplish. Each area of the theme park must be broken down
and managed, like different departments within a department store,
only on a much larger level. When the theme park will open, when
shifts will start and end, how many street vendors will be in the park
and where, and how long rides will last. These are all things that
need to be planned so the company can reach a larger goal. So how
Disney’s theme parks are managed would be part of their operational
strategy.

A weakness Disney may have in the operational strategy is the shear
size of the day-to-day operations. Managing all of the daily
operations that Disney has can become

quite a job to over see. If something goes wrong on ground level,
Disney’s customers directly see this breakdown and could have a
negative affect on sales. Disney’s ground level operations are always
being viewed by the customer, if a ride breaks down, what is the
backup plan? If someone does not show up for his or her shift, will he
or she have someone to cover him or her? These are all things that
need answers when developing the operational strategy.

Opportunities

A business operational opportunity was stated by Merriam-Webster
Online Dictionaryam (2005) “as a good chance for advancement or
progress”. When companies look across their business they describe
opportunities as way to position the business to succeed were their
competition has failed. The Walt Disney Corporation has taken
business opportunities to a different level by using its brand name
recognition.

They have mixed advertising, travel, and Disney Institute to the
highest opportunities. The Walt Disney Corporation has used radio,
video, and printed media to advertise their business...

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