This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Document Analysis Of Mary Price, Alias Hartington, Sexual Offences : Sodomy, 26th April, 1704. The Proceedings Of The Old Bailey Ref: T17040426 42

1356 words - 5 pages

This analysis is based on the proceedings of the Old Bailey trial of Mary Price alias Hartington and concerns an accusation made against her of sodomy with her dog. It is an original document from 1704 and so it is considered a primary source document. Mary was indicted for sodomy committed with a dog, an action brought against her by an upstairs neighbour on the statement and testimony of events she claims her daughter saw the defendant commit on 25th March 1704.The case was eventually dismissed and Mary Price was acquitted by the jury of the day, due to the lack of evidence that could be substantiated against her and after an investigation by a local constable at the scene of where the alleged crime took place. There also seemed to be attestation, from the testimony of other witnesses, that there had been previous private altercations between defendant and plaintiff and the jury apparently have come to the decision that the evidence given was not able to be substantiated as credible testimony. The crime of sodomy is a capital offence, also known as a felony offence and can at its most extreme be punishable by the death penalty, if found guilty. The death penalty was used only in extreme cases and only when the jury thought that such a sentence handed down by the judge would be fitting. If a jury felt that the person being charged did not warrant death, for example, for theft of items over a certain amount of value that would warrant the death, then they might be inclined to reduce the value of the goods stolen to below the value tariffs for automatic death penalty levels.This case is an excellent example of highlighting the way in which everyday, ordinary people were able to make use of the court system in place at this time. Even minor problems were able to be dealt with by use of the petty court system, as this was seen as a better way of dealing with domestic disputes, as opposed to the alternative and previously resorted to methods, such as violent discourse on a private basis. The evidence brought about in this example is wholly circumstantial and relies heavily upon third party eye witness evidence, which cannot be substantiated. The content and apparent absurdity of the charge shows how any person in the country with a neighbour problem, real or perceived, was able to bring about a court action in a way to mediate and resolve the problem, whatever their social position in society. It was probably not hard for her to refute the allegations as absurd, as, at this time in England, there were very few cases prosecuted revolving around allegations of bestiality and the sensationalist content of this trial would probably have brought about very strong feelings in the community and a solidarity with her by local residents that knew her and would later attest to her good character. The fact that the jury acquitted the defendant shows that the people chosen for jury service were able to distinguish between false accusations and real and that they...

Find Another Essay On Document analysis of Mary Price, alias Hartington, sexual offences : sodomy, 26th April, 1704. The Proceedings of the Old Bailey Ref: t17040426-42

The 26th President of The United States: Theodore Roosevelt

3097 words - 12 pages Theodore Roosevelt Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt became the 26th president of the United States in 1901 after the assassination of William McKinley. INTRODUCTION PARAGRAPH Roosevelt was born on October 27, 1858 in New York City to Theodore “Thee” Roosevelt, Sr. and Martha “Mittie” Bulloch. Throughout his young life he was known to friends and family members as “Teedie” because he was not very fond of the nickname “Teddy.” As a young boy

Successes and Failures of Sexual Offences Act 2003

1419 words - 6 pages Successes and Failures of Sexual Offences Act 2003 The Sexual Offences Act 2003 was heralded as a response to shifting social attitudes, encompassing the broad libertarian approach towards sexual behaviour that has become increasingly dominant since the Act that preceded it whilst attempting to account for the myriad of more widespread sexual deviancies and abusive practices that were otherwise poorly regulated by

Atwood's Framing of the Story in "Alias Grace"

1768 words - 7 pages postmodern analysis of Victorian America, Atwood employs many different techniques. The novel is a fusion of different genres a common theme of postmodern literature. For example, Alias Grace contains elements of Gothic literature. This was extremely evident by the supernatural foreshadowing infused in the novel, such as the true apple peel fortunes made by Grace and Mary Whitney. Atwood also uses the genres of a frame story and a historical novel to

Alias Grace Literary Essay: The Consequence of Childhood

1748 words - 7 pages Childhood is often perceived as a period of innocence and purity. However, it is also the period of time where a person’s fundamental character is established, which can be easily affected by the conditions of the child’s environment. Alias Grace, a novel by Margaret Atwood, contains many themes centered on the concept of childhood and the influence of a person’s past. The book features a famous convicted murderess, Grace Marks, and a doctor

The Canadian Divorce Act: The Practicality of an Age-Old Document in Modern Day Society

1126 words - 5 pages neither one of them can force the other one to leave . These rules, as seen in the Divorce Act, make sure that any spouse who entered into marriage wealthy does not divorce and become poor. At the same time, it also guarantees that the spouse that was contributing less does not leave the marriage empty handed.In conclusion, the Divorce Act has always been, and continues to be, a document that allows couples to divorce with few discrepancies. It

The Battle of Ypres, April 1915

902 words - 4 pages It came in the year 1915 when the "New Born" Canadian Army was moved from what was their somewhat silent sector on the Western Front to the apparent space in the line in front of the town of Ypres, Belgium. On the right of the Canadians would be two British Divisions, and on the left would be a French division comprised of Algerian colonialists.It would be here, at Ypres on April 22, 1915 that the German Army would introduce crude and chaotic

Beer: The Production History and Consumption Of Beer with Ref

4454 words - 18 pages prevented long-range voyages over the oceans until recently. Christopher Columbus made his journey to the New World with wine on board, and the pilgrims landed on Plymouth Rock only because their beer provisions ran out. (Vallee 81)Evidence arguing against the widespread use of water can be found in the examination of both the Bible and Greek texts. In both versions of the Bible, Old and New Testaments, is virtually empty of references to water as

Episode 42 of Doctor Who Analysis

1353 words - 5 pages In the episode titled “42” of Doctor Who, Martha and the Doctor find themselves responding to a distress call aboard a spaceship set on a crash course with a not so distant star. The TARDIS has materialized upon S.S. Pentallian, captained by Kath McDonnell. The Doctor immediately learns the engines have ceased to work and a monitor on the wall announces there are fourty-two minutes until impact with the star. After being introduced to the

This book was about the first season of the television show 'Alias'. It was called "Alias: Declassified"

937 words - 4 pages The book "Alias: Declassified" is about the first season of the television show Alias. The author is Mark Cotta Vaz. He toured the production offices. He talked to just about everyone on the cast and crew. . This book is good for basic information about the television show Alias. The book starts with short bios of the actors and the characters they playJ. J. Abrams created the show. He loved James Bond movies in grade school. He was working on

Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey and the issue of literacy

845 words - 3 pages Literacy- The Path Trough AdversityFrederick Augustus Washington Bailey was born a slave on February of 1818, on a plantation house in Maryland (Blight). He later changed his name to Frederick Douglas (A&E video). His mothers name was Harriet Augustus, but Douglas did not know much about his father. Frederick separated himself from other slaves in that he learned how to read. He used Tommy Auld's spelling book to memorize the letters of the

A Day In The Life of Apostle Bailey

923 words - 4 pages The Mailbox My brother and I were riding down the street on our bikes, right after our parents had told us not to. There was old woman who lived on our street that acted as a one-woman neighborhood watch. As we rode down the street she shuffled out of her house and onto her porch. Just as we passed her house she yelled, “Ride on the curb, you’re going to get hit by a car!” Disregarding her tip, we raced up the street to meet some of our friends

Similar Essays

Horsmanden's Journal Of The Proceedings Essay

1501 words - 6 pages absolved from guilt as well (Zabin, p.118). This idea is supported by Mary Burton and all the testimonies against the people that she gave and Arthur Price who was so successful at drawing confession out from others with amiable chatter. Both had something to gain from their actions. In the very beginning, Mary was promised her freedom (Zabin, p.51) and Arthur Price no doubt hoped for some sort of mercy in regards to his thieving (Zabin, p.69

Case Study: The Mind Of Alias Grace

1086 words - 4 pages In Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood, Doctor Simon Jordan is a psychologist that is analyzing and talking to convict Grace Marks with the ultimate goal of unlocking the truth behind the murder case of Thomas Kinnear and Nancy Montgomery. Parts of Grace’s memory are missing completely, and through constant discussions with Doctor Jordan about her dreams and memories from the past, Doctor Jordan is trying to find a way around the memory blocks while

Offences Against The Administration Of Justice

2122 words - 9 pages . The principles and procedures governing the Court's exercise of jurisdiction over offences under this article shall be those provided for in the Rules of Procedure and Evidence. The conditions for providing international cooperation to the Court with respect to its proceedings under this article shall be governed by the domestic laws of the requested State. 3. In the event of conviction, the Court may impose a term of imprisonment not

Offences Against The Administration Of Justice

1019 words - 5 pages to contempt of court . However referring back to the ICC, it seems such acts are not punishable under Article 71 of the Rome Statute. The notion of ' misconduct' itself has not been clarified in the Statute, however the Rules of Procedure and Evidence, Rule 170(a) by mentioning the "…disrupting the proceedings of the Court" has tried to make it clear and also covers refusal to comply with a direction by the Court. The sanctions for the