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Don Quixote: The Writings Of Cervantes

863 words - 4 pages

The writings of Cervantes may have been influenced by the writings of Shakespeare, Petrarch, etc. regarding concepts such as the story-within-a-story and the tyrannical female image, giving them a spot in the classical genre. However, Don Quixote has received multiple criticism for its style of writing and ambiguity, but of course, like many other authors, Cervantes had a clear reason why there were mini-narratives surrounding the main one. Despite critics’ opinions that the stories in Don Quixote are irrelevant, Cervantes included the stories on purpose to develop Don Quixote’s character through themes such as deception/manipulation and delusion/imagination that are seen in the main narrative and side narratives.

Although delusion and deception are synonyms, the significant difference is that delusion is a passive act that acts upon the mind without active participation of the individual, while with deception, the individual controls it. However, deception as a theme in this literary work does not only mean self-deception, but also by supporting characters. In the tale of Inappropriate Curiosity/the Curious Impertinent, telling of a man set on testing his wife’s loyalty, manipulation by other characters is present, similar to Don Quixote’s situation with his friends. Primarily, the tale builds up Don Quixote’s character by creating a parallel or a co-definer. The main character, Anselmo, mirrors certain aspects of Don Quixote in several ways. In terms of deception, Lothario fools Anselmo into believing that Lothario is really courting Camilla, equating to Don Quixote’s friends fooling him into believing that a character from a book was responsible for making the books in his library disappear. Also, with a hint of the tyrannical woman concept, Camilla manipulates Anselmo’s outlook by faking her own death, only to get rid of him once and for all and continue her affair with Lothario. Moreover, Anselmo and Don Quixote both strictly follow ideologies that are different from those of their friends. Despite them trying to convince both men to stop, Anselmo and Don Quixote are stubborn and orthodox, causing them to become outsiders. Both men also suffer sadness and confusion in connection to delusion or imagination. Anselmo deludes himself into believing that Camilla is not faithful even though she is, while Don Quixote deludes himself into believing that the windmills were giants, etc. The parallel continues with both men always looking for trouble and testing fate without knowing the consequences. The priest even says that Anselmo is an “unrealistically naïve and idiotic character,” as much as Don Quixote is. All in all, the tale of the...

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