Drug Testing For Athletes Essay

894 words - 4 pages

Case Study Paper: Drug Testing for Athletes in Public School Supreme Court Case Vernonia School District vs. Acton I chose to do my case study paper on drug testing in public schools.This is of great interest to me as a teacher and coach because our school district recently decided to random test our student-athletes. My awareness of the solvent facts in this case will enable myself to be recognascent of any problems that may arise in the future.This case begins with a typical small logging town in Oregon in 1991.Administrators, school officials, and school board members were concerned of the rampant use of drugs and alcohol in their school community, especially among athletes. They decided to implement a mandatory drug test at the beginning of each sport season and random tests throughout the season beginning in 7th "“12th grades. James Acton, a 7th grader, signed up to play football but his parents refused to sign the consent form or take the test. James was denied participation in football because he refused to abide by the rules and regulations set forth by the policy of the school board.No big deal"¦Wrong! The parents decided to file a lawsuit in federal court claiming the drug test violated the 4th Amendment's ban on unreasonable searches, the 14th Amendment's protection of liberty and privacy, and also the Oregon Constitution. The District judge dismissed the suit, but the United States Court of Appeals reversed the decision. After several appeals, this case went all the way to the United States Supreme Court to review the case and give a final ruling.The United States Supreme Court ruled that the drug testing was constitutional under the 4th and 14th amendments and James could not participate in football or any athletics until he submitted to a drug test.There were specific reasons for the justice's rulings under both the 4th and 14 the amendments. First, let's look at what they said about the violation of James Acton's 4th amendment rights. The first factor to be considered in determining the reasonableness of the search is the nature of the privacy interest on which the search intrudes. In this case, the children have been committed to the temporary custody of the State as schoolmaster, which gives them greater control than it could exercise over a free adult. Because the school was "drug-invested" the special needs clause is in effect and probable cause takes a back seat to the problem at hand. Furthermore, the privacy interests compromised by the process of obtaining urine under the policy are...

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