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Dyslexia And Language Acquisition Essay

1068 words - 4 pages

Dyslexia and Linguistics AcquisitionThis research paper basically focuses on the effects of dyslexia on language acquisition and development and considered strategies that can be used to promote inclusive learning in acquiring a language. The consideration of the nature of dyslexia's patient of the learning difficulty is crucial to the consideration of its effects as postulated in this research paper. There are numerous definitions of dyslexia, majority of which are deficit definitions. It is most commonly described as a difficulty with processing written language. More recent research has shown that it is a complex neurological condition, which is constitutional in origin and may affect oral language skills and numeracy, in addition to those in the above definition. Consequently, the traditional view of dyslexia as just a problem has been challenged and it is being defined in terms of differences in cognition and learning rather than deficits. The method of surveys and interviews were used in order of gathering information on the dyslexics. The questionnaire was mailed to the respondent to give more natural setting to them as they might get anxious or nervous being with the researchers. Avoiding any tension atmosphere, the questionnaire will be answered naturally without any ambiguous feeling by the respondent when they are alone. Finally, any approaches in this research paper are only small doses. Further reading and researches are needed concerning deeper understanding of dyslexia.Dyslexia is a very broad term defining a learning disability that impairs a person's fluency or comprehension accuracy in being able to read, and which can manifest itself as a difficulty with phonological awareness, phonological decoding, orthographic coding, auditory short-term memory, or rapid naming. Dyslexia is separate and distinct from reading difficulties resulting from other causes, such as a non-neurological deficiency with vision or hearing, or from poor or inadequate reading instruction. For instance, an early definition by the World Federation of Neurology in 1968 stated it to be 'a disorder in children who, despite conventional classroom experience, fail to attain the language skills of reading, writing and spelling commensurate with their intellectual abilities'. More recent research has shown that it is a complex neurological condition, which is constitutional in origin and may affect oral language skills and numeracy. It is believed that dyslexia can affect between 5 to 10 percent of a given population although there have been no studies to indicate an accurate percentage.This problem is not related but may be connected with laterality and hemispheric asymmetry of the brain. Many dyslexics tend to have above-average visuo-spatial abilities and to be creative and good at multi-dimensional thinking and problem-solving. There are three proposed cognitive subtypes of dyslexia: auditory, visual and attentional. Reading disabilities, or dyslexia, is the...

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