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Economic Expansion In The Late Nineteenth Century And Early Twentieth Century

890 words - 4 pages

Economic expansion in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century was driven by economic expansion and sole beliefs. In the past the United States was an agricultural nation and based there economy on farming. Since the United States based there economy on farming they need to expand was necessary for the country to grow. However as time went on the slow transition between farming to big business changed the motives for America’s expansion. In both era’s however the United States was able to justify its expansion through national belief.
Before the nineteenth century America had an agriculturally based economy and wanted to expand its nation for this use. The United States slowly grew after the American Revolution through warfare and land purchase. Thomas Jefferson signed the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 which doubled the size of the United States and this promoted more land usage and westward expansion. This expansion however caused problems that lead up to warfare such as the civil war. When new lands were acquired through these treaties problems such as the expansion of slavery and relations with the Natives Americans arose. America became bigger through land treaties such as the Louisiana Purchase and the Gadsden purchase and also through warfare like Spanish American war and Mexican war. However as time went on land treaties and warfare died down and expansion beyond North America became another motive. America slowly but eventually changed from an agricultural based economy to a more big business and trade economy. At the time nations had their own spheres of influence and within that sphere they tried to dominate trade and commerce. In document A Thomas Nast cartoon displays countries trying to establish their own influence in weaker countries like Africa. As countries tried to establish their influences and dominate commerce within these counties nations started to get upset by this. In document D by the American Anti-Imperialist league they state that foreign intervention with in the Philippines is starting to cause problems because the people feel that their civil liberties and there nationalism are suffering. America wanted to expand its markets throughout the Pacific, Latin America, and Asia nations. Although the United States wanted to expand they didn’t want counties to end up like Africa did because Africa was know divided into several nations due to European intervention. Since the United States didn’t want this to occur they established the “Open Door” policy with China. This insured that all nations trading in China were fair and equal between other nations. In Document G the picture represents equal trading rights and involvement in World affairs. As imperialism was on the rise of the stronger...

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