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Education And Virginia’s Woolf’s A Room Of One’s Own

1089 words - 4 pages

“Only the gold and silver flowed now, not from the coffers of the king, but from the purses of men who had made, say a fortune from industry, and returned, in their wills, a bounteous share of it to endow more chairs, more lectureships, more fellowships in the university where they had learnt their craft” (754). This is a quote from Virginia’s Woolf’s essay, “A Room of One’s Own”. Here she is making a point about universities and the funding that they received from men that had gone to school there. Woolf’s essay takes place during the early nineteen hundreds when most women did not attend a university. There was great inequality of those who attended school because men had control over all the money. The men in society either received money from inheritances, or from industrial occupations, as Woolf mentions in her quote. Woolf’s essay focuses on the inequality of female writers’ recognition compared to men’s. She points out the fact that women writers were not very recognized by society because of their gender. This is true for the time period, but the reason that these women were not recognized is because of educational reasons.

During Woolf’s time (the early 1900’s) women simply did not have the same resources that men had in order to be educated. The most important resource that they were lacking in was money. It took lots of money to be educated, and very few women had money of their own to attend a university. For the few that were educated, their education took place at an institution that was much less funded than a man’s institution. This funding for the institution includes the building itself and the quality of education. The quality of the education depends on the teachers that teach the classes and the quality of materials that students work with. If this idea of funding of institutions had to be put into an equation, the equation would read: better funding equals better writings. Thankfully times have changed, and women writers are recognized equally as men are today in society. The main reason is that women today have an equal chance at education. Education today is open to everyone, because education can be paid for, or funded in various ways.

Universities today are much easier to attend for anyone that wishes to go to school. There are so many different types of programs out there today that make education more affordable for people that do not have the assets to pay for an education themselves. There are many forms of financial aid available for specific groups of people. For example, there are scholarship programs set up specifically for women, or programs set up specifically for minorities. There are also programs set up for people with certain disabilities. These programs are set up in this sort of way to give everyone a chance to fit in to one of the specific categories. There are many ways to apply for these types of financial aid. You can do them through your high school, place of work, or even...

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