Education Reform In America Essay

1167 words - 5 pages

Introduction
America faces a serious higher education problem. More people are going to college than ever before, yet there is a lack of highly skilled workers. Students are graduating with a wealth of information yet have few real world skills and a mountain of debt to show for their efforts. A recent report from Mcinsey in conjuction with chegg.com found “Employers fret that too many college graduates arrive on the job without having acquired the skills and habits to succeed in the workplace.” Another study from researchers at Georgetown University shows that the economy will face a shortage of 5 million workers with the necessary education and training by 2020. Meanwhile, the rising cost of college and the debt many students and families are expected to incur are raising questions in some quarters about the value of college as an investment, even as critics take aim at the cost structures and traditional practices of colleges and universities in general. The education system needs to be overhauled to remove many of the general education requirements that currently burden students.
historical backround
The history of american colleges colleges has two parts. According to noted historian David Katz “early american college were more a place where one learned to become a gentleman, than a place of learning.” In fact Benjamin franklin reported that in his youth Harvard had already become a rich mans school, a place where wealthy parents sent their sons to learn nothing more than the social skills of gentlemen (Lucas 1994, p. 109). Due to these non acedemic goals, college consisted mostly of latin, hebrew, history and perhaps a little math. Little thought was put into things of actual relevance to a persons future. Students were being trained to become future leaders.
In his book Higher Educatin and the New Society George Keller quotes historian Laurence Veysey as saying “the decades between 1870 and 1910 witnessed the only genuine ‘academic revolution’ yet to be experienced in the United States.” Colleges began offering classes in things like agriculture, mechanical arts,Engineering. Schools began having a more research focus and began offering Phd degrees. Keller writes that “An annoyed reaction to the growing emphasis on the sciences, research, and graduate and professional schools and in part a strategy to keep many of the ideals of the old-time college alive but without the onerous stress on the classics, the inculcation of religious virtue, and the use of unscholarly faculty. Called the liberal arts or general education, the programs became the bedrock of America’s smaller colleges” (91-92) Due to this backlash America became stuck with general education requirements, the implications of which will be discussed in the coming paragraphs. (paragraph needs a lot of work)
problems
As the twentieth century progressed and unskilled labor became a thing of the past the need for college evolved. General education became less and less...

Find Another Essay On Education Reform in America

Prison Reform In America Essay

1872 words - 7 pages Prison "Reform" in America In the essay "Prison "Reform" in America," Roger T. Pray points out the much attention that has been devoted to research to help prevent crimes. Showing criminals the errors of their ways not by brutal punishment, but by locking them up in the attempt to reform them. Robert Pray, who is a prison psychologist, is currently a researcher with the Utah Dept. of Corrections. He has seen what

Education Reform in Japan Essay

1249 words - 5 pages Yutori education used in Japan from 2002 to 2011 was education method to develop students’ creativity, with yutori meaning pressure-free. This idea was brought in Japan around 1990s and was used all around Japan in 2002. (The Decline in the Academic Level of Japanese Children and the Development of Educational Reform, Kajita Eiichi) It was new type of education method which believed students’ creativity and opinion will grow, but ended up just

Illegal Immigration Reform in America

1352 words - 5 pages One of the most controversial topics today in politics is what to do about illegal immigration in the United States. Should we consider all of the illegal immigrants felons? Should we give them full citizenship rights? These are all important questions related to illegal immigration. In 1986, the Immigration Reform and Control Act made it illegal for employers to knowingly hire undocumented workers and imposed fines of up to $11,000 for each

Education Reform in American Schools

1670 words - 7 pages Education Reform in American Schools Frederick Douglass was, and still is, a golden example of why education is so important to a human being’s life. Douglass spent the first part of his life in ignorance. However, his life of a seemingly endless servitude and ignorance was completely shattered by the fact that he learned to read. Once he learned to read, his life was forever changed. He escaped slavery and tyranny and became an icon even

Public Education in America

1950 words - 8 pages Education for Rich?The United States of America has been ranked 12 according to the United Nation's 2008 human development index report in committing towards education by public spending. According the U.S. Department of Education, the federal, state and local governments had spent a total of 786.8 billion dollars in 2006 on education and it is estimated that in the year 2008, about 837.7 billion dollars has been spent. In the school year of

Education Inequality in America

1814 words - 7 pages Education Inequality in America Background      Will Durant, a businessman and the founder of General Motors, once said, “Education is the transmission of civilization.” Unfortunately, education is still one of the most deliberated and controversial issues in the United States. Thus far, the privilege or right to receive education has not attained the level of equality throughout the nation; poor districts obtain less educational funding

Education in America

1317 words - 5 pages schooling and are lucky if they even earn a GED. As a recent graduate of high school, and a product of this country’s educational system, I have had the opportunity to develop my own opinions regarding the myth of education in our society. Based upon my observations going through the school system, and the various arguments posed by several authors in “Rereading America”, I strongly believe that schooling in this society caters solely to

Public Health Care Reform in America

1346 words - 5 pages health protects you and keeps you and your loved ones safe and healthy. Everyday. Day after day. There are several public health measures that need to be actively engaged in order to help reform health care in America. Public health measures focus on the population, sanitation, disease control, infant mortality, nutrition, occupational health, and environmental health. Modern sanitation was one of the greatest public health accomplishments

The Role of Education in Welfare Reform

1894 words - 8 pages Since the enactment of the Welfare Reform Act in 1996; the new changes have been instrumental in decreasing the number of welfare caseloads and unemployment rates. Many would argue that the reforms for welfare have not been active in requiring that welfare recipients improve their education, skills and job market ability. The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program requires welfare recipients to search for a job first in exchange

Leadership Through Curricular Reform in Music Education

2549 words - 10 pages method of arrival allowing teachers more creativity and flexibility (Powers, 2013, p. 36). Music teachers nationwide are looking to the revision of the standards as another benchmark in music education. The Common Core Standards are a great influence on modern curriculum reform. As the Standards are revised within the next year, music curricula will have to be adapted to meet the new standards on the state and national levels. Using the

Douglass Reeves: Assessment Reform in Education

1500 words - 6 pages Douglass Reeves has devoted a great deal of time and energy championing assessment reform in education. He believes that current practices employed by so many educators are not only deeply flawed, but unjust to the very peoples who are intended to be the beneficiaries of our educational system. Among Mr. Reeves’ many proposals, his “Case Against Zeros” is perhaps his most revolutionary… and controversial. The crux of his

Similar Essays

Education Reform As I See It. This Essay Is About My Views Of Education Reform In America.

1013 words - 4 pages Education Reform As I See ItThe easiest way to teach is: to hand a student a book, tell them to answer the questions and then test them on the text content. This "facilitation" is the way many teachers in the public education system teach. This method only reaches those who have good reading comprehension. Those who have other learning styles such as: auditory, visual, or kinesthetic are educationally neglected and thereby often fall through the

Reform Judaism In America Essay

698 words - 3 pages Reform Judaism in America There are three main denominations of Judaism. These denominations are Reform, Conservative, and Orthodox. Reform Judaism started to arise in America with the arrival of the German Jews. German Jews began to immigrate to the United States in large number in the 1840's. The German Jews could find better economic opportunities and more freedom in America. In December 1824,Isaac Harby, along with fifty other Jews from

Welfare Reform In America Essay

1460 words - 6 pages quality of education).And I think it slipped out how I would try to bring down the number ofchildren born into poverty. But how are we going to remedy the problemswith wealth distribution? Well, we could use the problem with wealthdistribution to our advantage and institute a wealth tax. A wealth taxhas been instituted in many European countries. Here is what the Swissmodel for a wealth tax applied to America would look like:Net worth, excluding

Immigration Reform In America Essay

1382 words - 6 pages America has always been a land of immigrants, which is why we need to fix our broken immigration system and laws. Coming to America has always been a dream for those living in other countries and it takes entirely too long for that to happen. They have to get behind all of the others that want to come and have been waiting for years. This is why we need to make a change. It takes too long to come to the United States and discourages anyone from