This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Effect Of The Environment On Westward Expansion

619 words - 2 pages

As the country grew and expanded, the American people where always one to push their bounds. In 1763, we proudly, defied England's proclamation of the year, and settled west of the Appalachian mountains. A little later, the westward people pushed Indians, animals, and society to a place where no American person had gone before. But all the while, one important factor determined where they transported themselves, where they settled, and what they did when they got there. This factor, the environment, profoundly affected the settlers way of life, and other factors, such as the Indians and the railroad, only aggravated a pre-existing condition.The settlers of the late 1800's had only one way to get to the west- along the pre-existing routes established by the courier-de-bois, Spanish settlers, and the Indians of the past. These routes, which flowed through the only passable areas of the Rockies, naturally led to Oregon and California, which caused an increase in the population of these regions at the time. These trails, such as the Oregon Trail to the north, the Mormon and Spanish Trail to the south, and the California and Overland trails in between were very rough and bumpy, making the trek no easy task.On the home front, the environment played an important role on the family life as well.. Women had a more prominent role in society as we shifted from the urbanized east to the more agrarian west. They were expected to do more than they did in the past, such as make the clothing everyone in the family wore, while the man was off toiling in the desert in search for food. With an increased sense of independence, women had gained rights to vote and proprietorship. But with this increased sense of independence came the added responsibility of being the family doctor, chef, and provider of family comfort and support. Women even...

Find Another Essay On Effect of the Environment on Westward Expansion

The Effect of Pesticides on the Environment

583 words - 2 pages The Effect of Pesticides on the Environment Whenever the subject of pesticides comes up, it's easy to point a finger at farmers. But we homeowners, with our manicured lawns and exotic flower gardens, have nothing to be smug about. Each year we pour approximately 136 million pounds of pesticides on our homes, lawns, and gardens, which amounts to three times more per acre than the average farmer applies. In fact, most of the wildlife pesticide

Effect of road salt on the environment

1445 words - 6 pages immediate. Most of the organism are only one cell big and blow up in contact with increased amounts of salt.Water insects are also effected by the increase in salt in the environment. The number of insects lowers because the inability for water insects to reproduces in the presence of high salt concentrations. With the decreasing numbers in microorganisms, insects and fish, it is easy to see the effect it would have on the rest of the food chain

The Transcontinental Railroad And Westward Expansion

2439 words - 10 pages The Transcontinental Railroad and Westward Expansion Thesis: The transcontinental railroad greatly increased Westward expansion in the United States of America during the latter half of the nineteenth century. The history of the United States has been influenced by England in many ways. In the second half of the 1800's, the railroad, which was invented in England, had a major effect on Western expansion in the United States. "Railroads

Pollutions effect on the environment

637 words - 3 pages have a negative effect on the environment. Light pollution affects nearby ecosystems and disrupts the function of the food web chain. Light pollution is especially harmful to nocturnal animals as it can disrupt their navigation ability. Pollution is harmful to the environment no matter what form it comes in. The world needs to stop creating machines and factories that release harmful chemicals that cause pollution and harm the environment. The

Pesticides Effect on the Environment

1533 words - 7 pages to make that its use quickly spread over the globe. In 1948, Muller was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for its discovery. DDT was also used for many non-agricultural applications as well such as to delouse soldiers in WWII and, until the 1960 to control mosquitoes in residential areas of the US. In this essay, I will discuss the effects pesticides have on the environment, wildlife, and human health. Pesticides Effect on the

Mans Effect On The Environment

2052 words - 8 pages Man’s Effect on the Environment 1) SOURCES OF POLLUTION Freshwater Environments : Man pollutes freshwater all over the world in many ways there is much waste and pollution that ends up in rivers. One of the main hazards is called eutrophication, this process becomes enriched with artificial nutrients from fertilisers which run off into the rivers and upset the natural nutrient cycle of the river, lake or pond. The water turns green because

The Effect of Economic Progress on the Environment

908 words - 4 pages the environment. For the economic progress, most of the countries depend on the industrial field today. Most of the industries are situated in the bank of the rivers and they release their wastes into the river water which is harm full for the water as well as for the people who are using the water. The chemicals get mixed with the water that is very toxic and bad for health without any doubt. In Bangladesh, there is an example of river

The Effect of the Environment on a Plant´s Growth

931 words - 4 pages temperatures reduce the growth rates of plants more than they reduce photosynthesis which increases the amount of carbohydrates stored in a plant. There are also many other factors which effect the growth of the plants, but the main factors are environment and temperature. Allelopathy is the word that refers to the positive and negative effects of one plant on another. The main factor that is affected by have one plant near another is growth. Like I said

The Effect of the External Environment on Work in Australia

2034 words - 8 pages The Effect of the External Environment on Work in Australia This essay considers how changes in the external environment of organisations have altered the world of work. Australia is currently experiencing a period of economic growth. But some new challenges have appeared. Australian organisations are facing skill shortages and an aging workforce. This shortage has been addressed by introduction of new technology in workplaces and influx of

Growth of Human Population and Its Effect on the Environment

1659 words - 7 pages be measured by the ecological footprint and the adequate amounts of producible land and sea that would be required to produce enough food and other resources to sustain life. Carrying Capacity The carrying capacity is defined as the maximum load on the environment sustainable by all species and the period of time that food and resources are available in the environment. The concepts considered “beyond a certain threshold, resources will not be

Dramatic effect of gas pollution on the environment

946 words - 4 pages Industrial Revolution, and was blamed on exaggerated use of fossil fuels, and the considerable deforestation that every year eliminates many hectares of forestation. This fast increase could cause, in the near future, a significant rise in temperature that, according to scientists, is already in progress, and a space-time alteration of precipitation patterns. Such phenomenon would have a considerable impact on the environment, representing a threat to

Similar Essays

The Impact Of Westward Expansion On The Cherokee Nation

1661 words - 7 pages The Impact of Westward Expansion on The Cherokee Nation Josh Powers U.S. History 1 Period 5 Mr. Jacobson 3/31/2014 At the time Andrew Jackson was president, there was a fast growing population and a desire for more land. Because of this, expansion was inevitable. To the west, many native Indian tribes were settled. Andrew Jackson spent a good deal of his presidency dealing with the removal of the Indians in western land

Turner And The Glorification Of Westward Expansion

1668 words - 7 pages to look back at its conquest of the West in a very positive light. In many ways Turner was right, the West did help define the American identity, and it makes sense that Americans would look back at this creation in very positive terms. If American history is based on Westward expansion, then it is none too appealing to realize that Westward expansion meant the brutal conquest of the native population. To come to grips with this reality

The Westward Expansion Essay

994 words - 4 pages costs to the westward expansion of the US, including 20,000 settles dying due to difficulties during the settlements, 13,283 soldiers killed during the US-Mexican War, and hundreds of millions of dollars wasted on wars, treaties, and sales of lands. There were many benefits of the US expansion on the optimistic side. The US doubled its size, GDP , and population during this time. The US also won respect among other countries and gained more trading partners. There were many effects that westward expansion had on US culture.

Westward Expansion In The Us Essay

2359 words - 9 pages ' expansion westward was directly related to three quantitatively important forces, the first of which being the stock of usable land, the second being population size. As both of these increased, as did the rate of Western Expansion. The third force was the cost of transportation, which has a positive effect on expansion as it decreased. These phenomenon can be observed through the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark Expedition, the War of 1812, the