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Effective Use Of Foreshadowing And Symbolism In Steinbeck's Of Mice And Men

726 words - 3 pages

There are very creative writers, which date back to the 1900s, who use plenty of literary devices to help make their story creations a work readers will enjoy reading. Back in the 1930’s, in Salinas, California, there were ranches on which men from all over the country worked. There is a story about the life of two men on those fields, working, as the author describes what happens to them through literary devices that aid the reader to understand the moral of it. In John Steinbeck’s novel, Of Mice and Men, masses of foreshadowing and symbols are used to higher the effect the story gives the reader.
In this novel, various symbols are used to boost the overall significance of what the author is trying to inform the reader about. For example, in this novel, one of Steinbeck’s uses of symbolism is in the beginning. Lennie, and George, two main characters from the novel are walking down the road to their latest ranch after their bus driver says that he can’t take them any further towards the farm. George perceives Lennie trying to inconspicuously take out a dead mouse from his pocket. “Uh-uh, Jus’ a dead mouse, George. I didn’t kill it. Honest! I found it. I found it dead” (5). Lennie didn’t murder the mouse, he just likes to pet soft things. Steinbeck has made the mouse the symbol for the soft objects Lennie likes to pet. Once after George demands that Lennie disposes of the mouse, they commence their journey to the new ranch they will be working on. Since Lennie always gets them both into trouble, George told Lennie not to verbalize when they got to the ranch. “He got kicked in the head by a horse when he was a kid” (22). George is making up a justification to the boss why he is answering the questions that are geared towards Lennie. This somewhat notifies the reader why Lennie is the way he is. John Steinbeck illustrates his use of symbolism very well in this novel. He also demonstrates another literary device, foreshadowing, in this novel well too.
Of Mice and Men includes lots of foreshadowing which also helps improve how well the...

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