Ego And Super Ego In Lord Of The Flies By William Golding

1125 words - 5 pages

Taressa Soto Soto 1
Brhamst
English
8 April 2014 Lord Of The Flies

“Where Id was there shall Ego be” -Sigmund Freud. Once you realize you cannot have everything in life like your Id wants, one creates their Ego. So where the Id was is where the Ego will eventually form to balance your Id out. Freud believed everyone's born with an Id, and ones Ego and Superego are later on developed in life. Throughout the novel a Freudian psychological allegory is expressed, relating to ones mind and the way a person thinks. This is where the Id, Ego and Superego fit in. Sigmund Freud believed the mind was structured into these three different parts. In the novel these structured areas of the ...view middle of the document...

He ignores his duties to keep the fire going and leaves with the hunters to go hunt a pig. “Kill the pig! Cut her throat! Bash her in” (Golding 75). Jack disregards the fact that by not watching over the fire it might go out and their chances of being rescued and surviving could be diminished. Instead of survival Jack turns to his impulse, violence. The Id is not driven by Violence but encourages whatever brings one pleasure. Jack, the Id of the novel who acts on compulsion is driven by violence, the impulse of killing and blood brings him joy.
Piggy through righteous actions is best depicted as the Superego in the psychological allegory throughout the novel. The Superego is described as ones conscious, the part of the mind that focuses on responsibility, following all rules and morals. Throughout the novel Piggy tries to keep peace between the boys, even while on an abandoned island he still enforces and follows the rules as if they are still in civilization. “We’ve got to have rules and obey them. After all, we’re not savages. We’re English, and the English are best at everything” (Golding 42). Often times many of the boys on the island get distracted from the constant worrying of how they will be rescued and end up playing and imagining like children are supposed to do. On the other hand Piggy never fails to remind them about their real responsibilities. Although there is no real adult or authority on the island Piggy’s the closest to it. The Superego is the part of the mind considered as your parent always choosing the correct decision, rethinking things before saying or doing them. Piggys moral, upright personality is best represented by the Superego of ones mind.
In addition, another element of the human mind in Freuds theory is the Ego who is best distinguished as Ralph.“The poor ego has a still harder time of it; it has to serve three harsh
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masters, and it has to do its best to reconcile the claims and demands of all three… The three tyrants are the external world, the superego, and the id.” -Sigmund Freud. The Ego is the balancer of the Id and Superego. Ralph...

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