Einsatzgruppen (Mobile Killing Squads) Essay

931 words - 4 pages

The time, 1941, the place, the then Soviet Union, the Red Army is in retreat from the German forces, following closely behind the German frontline is an unspeakable force coming over the conquered lands like a deadly plague. The Einsatzgruppen were considered as mobile death dealers by their victims. The major occupation of the Einsatzgruppen was the humiliation, extermination, and complete of annihilation of Jews, Romany or gypsies, members of the communist party, and intellectsia or major thinkers. They were organized to be the most efficient at occupying and murdering the undesirables. The leaders of these hounds of war were hand selected by Heydrich Himmler from the brightest, bravest, and most loyal of the Nazi members. The Einsatzgruppen were broken down to cover more area and to cause more chaos. Their techniques for killing were horrific, and in some cases could even tax the mind of the executioner. They were responsible for most of the murders of Jews during World War 2. Almost every huge massacre site they were at it killing undesirables.

The Einsatzgruppen were called into service in1941 to rid the conquered lands of the Soviet Union of Jews, Romany, and anyone who the Nazis thought would be a problem. The Einsatzgruppen were used to humiliate and kill the undesirables of Eastern Europe. (Edeiken) The Einsatzgruppen were also used as criminal police of the ghettos where the Jews were alienated. The Einsatzgruppen also held random shootings in the middle of the street in the ghettos. The Einsatzgruppen also were tasked with the protection of certain Jews that had skills

that were useful to the Nazis such as dentist, doctors, and mechanics. (The Einsatzgruppen) The Einsatzgruppen also profited from the executions of the victims by taking clothing, currency, and the gold teeth of Jews. The Einsatzgruppen would even use the spoils of war to pay those who helped with the executions. (Edeiken)

The commanders of the individual Einsatzgruppes were chosen from the best educated and most loyal Nazis by Reinhard Heydrich. Three of the four commanders of the Einsatzgruppes were doctors; one Otto Rasch was the only double PhD. The commander that did not have a PhD was Artur Nebe, who was the head of the Kripo. The leader of Einsatzgruppe A was Dr. Franz Walter Stahlecker. Stahlecker held a doctorate in law, and was responsible for the gross amount of deaths in Lithuania and Latvia, but they were responsible for an area that west from East Prussia to Leningrad. (The Einsatzgruppen) (Einsatzgruppen (Mobile Killing Units)) The leader of Einsatzgruppe B was Artur Nebe who was the only commander of the Einsatzgruppen who did not have a doctorate, but what he lacked in education he made up for in loyalty to the Third Reich. (The Einsatzgruppen) Einsatzgruppe B started from Warsaw and controlled all the way to Minsk. (Einsatzgruppen (Mobile Killing Units)) The commander of Einsatzgruppe C was Dr. Dr. Otto Rasch, who had a double doctorate. (The...

Find Another Essay On Einsatzgruppen (Mobile Killing Squads)

The Wannsee Conference Essay

1768 words - 7 pages On 20 January 1942, an interagency meeting of less than two hours, including lunch, was held at a lakeside villa, previously owned by Interpol, in Berlin's western suburb Wannsee to coordinate the implementation of the 'final solution of the Jewish question.' The meeting of high-ranking administrators of several ministries and other agencies was convened at the...

What does the term Holocaust mean to you?

2825 words - 11 pages What does the term Holocaust mean to you?This simple word, ever since the eighteenth century, refers to the violent deaths of a large number of people. When you hear death, does the idea of killing off millions randomly based on your background come to mind? The usual person thinks of death, as crashing, dying of old age,or murder. Although simple, there is a very dark history signifying its true meaning. Over eleven million deaths, based on...

Anti-Semitism.

1439 words - 6 pages Jews could be found in all walks of life, farmers, tailors, seamstresses, factory hands, accountants, doctors, teachers, and small-business owners. Many children ended their schooling early to work in a craft or trade; others looked forward to continuing their education at the university level. Whatever their differences, they all had one thing in common, by the 1930s, with the rise of the Nazis to power in Germany, they all became potential...

Atrocities of the Holocaust

1431 words - 6 pages Of all the examples of injustice against humanity in history, the Jewish Holocaust is one of the most prominent. From 1933 to 1945, the Nazis waged a vicious war against Jews and other "lesser races". This war came to a head with the "Final Solution" in 1938. One of the most horrific results of the Final Solution were the scores of concentration and death camps spread across Nazi Germany, Poland, and other parts of Nazi-controlled Europe. In the...

Destruction (holocaust)

1104 words - 4 pages Destruction (Holocaust) As a teenager of the year 3000 I want to take you back into a certain period of time. A time when people had their dreams and hopes stripped away from their future. The children of this period did not have the chance for freedom and equality. Like every historical event, the Holocaust evokes certain specific images. When the Holocaust is mentioned most people immediately think of concentration camps. People...

Why did the Nazis implement the Final Solution?

1168 words - 5 pages The Final Solution was the planned extermination of all the Jews in Europe by the Nazis, through systematic gassing. The implementation of the Final Solution after the Wannsee Conference in January 1942 can be explained by fundamentally, the core beliefs of Nazis and Anti-Semitism. Thus the Final Solution was also implemented because of Nazi obsession with solving the 'Jewish problem' which had failed in previous methods. The war, and in...

Holocaust and Armenian Genocide

2798 words - 11 pages The German Holocaust and the Armenian Genocide: two interconnected examples of crimes against humanityHistory contains many examples of glorious and memorable events that remind one of the greatness of the human mind and inspire him or her to pursue his or her own dreams. Nevertheless, it is also full of horrific events and monstrous doings such as genocides that...

Why did the Nazis treatment of the Jews change from 1939-45?

679 words - 3 pages On January 20, 1942 fifteen high ranking Nazi party and German government leaders gathered for an important meeting. They met in a wealthy section of Berlin to discuss a topic only known as 'The Final Solution'. The Nazis used this vague term to hide their policy of mass murder from the rest of the world; they were to remove the Jews from German society.In 1939 Germany invaded Poland and 2 million Polish Jews came under Nazi...

The Holocaust

1107 words - 4 pages The Holocaust was the murder and persecution of approximately 6 million Jews and many others by the Nazi regime and its collaborators. The Nazis came to power in Germany in January of 1933. The Nazis thought that the “inferior” Jews were a threat to the “racially superior” German racial community. The death camps were operated from 1941 to 1945, and many people lost their lives or were forced to work in concentration camps during these years. The...

Nazi Eugenics and Racial Hygiene

1385 words - 6 pages The Nazi’s perpetrated many horrors during the Holocaust. They enacted many cruel laws. They brainwashed millions into foolishly following them and believing their every word using deceitful propaganda tactics. They forced many to suffer doing embarrassing jobs and to live in crowded ghettos. They created mobile killing squads to exterminate their enemies. Finally, as part of “The Final Solution to the Jewish Question”, they made concentration...

Intentionalism and Adolf Hitler’s Rise to Power

2023 words - 8 pages The political and economic climate in Germany, prior to the Nazi regime, is what fueled the common man in his support of Hitler. The common man?s struggle in Germany at the time was to improve their living conditions and have someone to blame for their misfortune. Hitler, emerging out of the rubble Germany was left in after World War I, appealed to the Volk through his ideals and grand vision for Germany and its people. To ensure full...

Similar Essays

Persecution Of Jews During World War Ii

761 words - 3 pages Persecution of Jews increased during World War two as Nazis invaded more countries; which contained thousands of Jews. The increased number of Jews meant that the problem increased greatly. The ways in which the Nazis dealt with the Jews gradually changed throughout the years. First it started by isolating them from society, then exportation out of Europe, then ghettoisatiion;which failed because of the mass number of people. Later on they...

The Final Solution Essay

1413 words - 6 pages In the spring of 1941, as preparations were under way for the invasion of the USSR, Hitler proclaimed that a war of destruction was about to start. He called for the annihilation of the Bolshevik leadership, thus laying the foundation for the extermination of what Hitler considered to be the biological source of Bolshevism: the Jews of the USSR. The killings were to be conducted by four mobile SS units called Einsatzgruppen (action squads),...

Holocaust Essay

1038 words - 4 pages Outline Thesis: The Final Solution of Jewish question had three Stages: Stage 1, Stage 2, Stage 3.I. The first Stage of the Final Solution was basically killing squads, so called Einsatzgruppen.A. "Adolf Eichmann coldly declared, "Jewry is now suffering fate which, thought hard, is more than deserve. No compassion and certainly no sorrow are called for. In this historic conflict every Jew is our enemy" (Resnick...

Hitler's Tactics Of Torture Essay

1092 words - 4 pages When Hitler and the Nazi Party first entered power, they proposed strict and unimaginably radical policies. Their goal as the dominant political power was to create a “pure” German society. The idea of a “pure” German society stemmed from the idea that certain racial groups and ethnicities were undesirable and inferior. With that in mind, they sought to completely eliminate, through annihilation tactics, Jews, Gypsies, homosexuals, biracial...